Labor Relations and Productivity in the Building Trades

By William Haber; Harold M. Levinson | Go to book overview

VI
The Problem of Apprenticeship Training

At the close of World War II, the American construction industry was called upon to provide the greatest expansion of construction activity in the nation's history. The necessary restrictions which had been imposed on the industry during the war, in addition to the long building slump of the depression years, had created an enormous backlog of demand for new buildings of every type, though residential construction probably constituted the greatest immediate need. The prompt and effective meeting of this need presented a major challenge to the ingenuity and resourcefulness of the industry.

Clearly a vital requisite for the production of such a vast number of housing and other building units was an adequate supply of skilled tradesmen; in fact, however, an extreme shortage existed. While due in part to the problems that had been created by the war economy of the prior years, the shortage was also, in part at least, the culmination of a long history of inadequate apprentice training in the industry. Throughout the nineteenth century and continuing until World War I, the construction industry had depended primarily on overseas immigration as a source of skilled labor, though a number of trade schools and a few joint union-employer apprenticeship programs were established in the early 1900's.1 When the immigration doors were closed in the early 1920's, additional efforts were made to initiate apprenticeship programs, some of which operated with reasonable success. As late as 1928, however, a study conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics concluded that "the unsystematic and plan-

____________________
1
William Haber, Industrial Relations in the Building Industry ( Cambridge: Harvard Univ. Press, 1930), pp. 136-41.

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor Relations and Productivity in the Building Trades
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 267

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.