The First Cambridge Press in Its European Setting

By E. P. Goldschmidt | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B
RENAISSANCE TRANSLATIONS FROM THE GREEK

The prevailing lack of interest in these translations is not of recent date. Neither T. F. Dibdin in his Introduction to the Classics ( 1827), nor B. Botfield in his Prefaces to the Editiones Principes ( 1861) include them in their investigations, although the latter enumerates some of them briefly in his Preface. J. E. Sandys in his History of Classical Scholarship, vol. II ( 1908) has little to say about them. A few years ago, however, a group of American scholars initiated a collaborative enterprise to establish a list of all medieval and Renaissance translations from the Greek of which we hope to see the results some day.

What I have tried to give in the following brief tabulation is by no means a 'complete' survey of the existing translations. My list confines itself to printed editions and ignores known MSS. The choice of authors included or omitted is quite arbitrary. Short pieces found only in composite volumes are on the whole left out for brevity's sake, but some are listed because they seemed interesting to me. Aristotle, Hippocrates and Galen are not dealt with for no better reason than that their medieval and their Renaissance translations seem inextricably mixed up, and each of them demands a special study for which I am not qualified.

My main purpose in making this list was to give substance to my assertion on p. 23 that these 'printed Latin editions precede by a long time the appearance of the Greek originals'. By giving a fair number of examples I hope to have proved my point. To go beyond that, for example to prove their wide diffusion by listing all the known early editions, would have swelled this Appendix beyond the limits of the permissible.

NOTE. The material in this Appendix is not entered in the Index.

-72-

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The First Cambridge Press in Its European Setting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - Siberch's Ten Books 1
  • II - The Emphasis on Greek 21
  • III- Continental Scholar-Printers 41
  • Notes 57
  • Appendix A - List of Bullock's Books 69
  • Appendix B - Renaissance Translations from the Greek 72
  • Appendix C - Type Facsimiles 83
  • Index 95
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