A Revolutionary Pilgrimage: Being an Account of a Series of Visits to Battlegrounds & Other Places Made Memorable by the War of the Revolution

By Ernest C. Peixotto | Go to book overview

MOUNT VERNON

HAVING followed, as I had set out to do, the principal campaigns of the Revolution and visited the historic sites connected with them, I now was ready for my last pilgrimage--to the home of him who had presided over this great drama, its chief actor, the man by whose guiding hand the American armies had finally been led to victory.

On the 4th of December, 1783, Washington had bade farewell to his officers in the "Long Room" on the second floor of Fraunces' Tavern, that still stands at the corner of Broad and Pearl Streets in New York City (now restored and maintained by the Sons of the Revolution), and had gone to the water-front, crossed in a barge to New Jersey, and proceeded to Annapolis, where he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the American army before Congress there assembled. And by the following Christmas eve he had returned once more to his beloved Mount Vernon, a plain country gentleman, to take up his old life again.

So my especial object in visiting his home upon the Potomac on this occasion--which was not my first visit, nor, I hope, will it be my last--was to picture this Virginia gentleman, this retired general, back in his peaceful home during the years that followed the Revolution.

-347-

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A Revolutionary Pilgrimage: Being an Account of a Series of Visits to Battlegrounds & Other Places Made Memorable by the War of the Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Introductory 1
  • Introductory 3
  • Around Boston 7
  • I - The Beginning 9
  • II - Lexington and Concord 17
  • III - Bunker Hill 39
  • Ticonderoga and Lake Champlain 49
  • To the Plains of Saratoga 67
  • I - Ticonderoga to Fort Edward 69
  • II - The Green Mountains 76
  • III - The Mohawk Valley 87
  • IV - Saratoga 101
  • Down the Hudson 115
  • About New York 145
  • In the Jerseys 173
  • I- Trenton 175
  • II - Princeton 191
  • III - Morristown 204
  • Round About Philadelphia 213
  • I - Chadd's Ford and the Brandywine 215
  • II - Germantown 228
  • III - Valley Forge 236
  • Philadelphia 247
  • Campaigns in the Carolinas 271
  • I - Charleston 273
  • II - Through South Carolina 289
  • III - Guilford Court House 307
  • Through Virginia 315
  • I - Williamsburg 317
  • II- Yorktown 329
  • III - Hampton Roads 341
  • Mount Vernon 345
  • Mount Vernon 347
  • Washington 361
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