A Source Book of American Political Theory

By Benjamin Fletcher Wright Jr. | Go to book overview
Our institutions, founded on such generalities and abstractions as those of which we are treating, are like a splendid edifice built upon kegs of gunpowder. The abolitionists are trying to apply the match to the explosive materials under our Parliament House; we are endeavoring to anticipate them by drenching those materials with ridicule. No body deems them worth the trouble of argument, or the labor of removal. They will soon become incombustible and innocuous.
REFERENCES
C. H. AMBLER, Sectionalism in Virginia ( 1910).
W. E. DODD, The Cotton Kingdom ( 1919).
-----, Statesmen of the Old South ( 1911).
A. B. HART, Slavery and Abolition ( 1906).
G. HUNT, John C. Calhoun ( 1908).
J. MACY, The Anti-Slavery Crusade ( 1919).
C. E. MERRIAM, American Political Theories ( 1903).
A. NEVINS (ed.), American Press Opinion ( 1928).
V. L. PARRINGTON, The Romantic Revolution in America ( 1927).
U. B. PHILLIPS, American Negro Slavery ( 1918).
W. F. POOLE, Anti-Slavery Opinions Before 1800 ( 1873).
T. C. SMITH, Parties and Slavery ( 1906).
T. V. SMITH, The American Philosophy of Equality ( 1927).
S. B. WEEKS, "Anti-Slavery Sentiment in the South", in Publications of the Southern Historical Association ( 1899).
B. F. JR. WRIGHT, "George Fitzhugh on the Failure of Liberty", in Southwestern Political and Social Science Quarterly, VI, 219 ( 1925).

-477-

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A Source Book of American Political Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I- The Theocratic Ideal in Early New England 1
  • References 40
  • Chapter II- Constitutional Protest and Revolution 41
  • References 114
  • Chapter III- State Constitution Making during the Revolution 116
  • References 173
  • Chapter IV- The Framing and Ratification of the Federal Constitution 174
  • References 276
  • Chapter V- Under the New Constitution 277
  • References 366
  • Chapter VI- The Growth of Constitutional Democracy 367
  • References 431
  • Chapter VII- The Slavery Controversy 432
  • References 477
  • Chapter VIII- The Struggle for State Sovereignty 478
  • References 544
  • Chapter IX- Some Recent Tendencies 545
  • References 642
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