George Rogers Clark: His Life and Public Services

By Temple Bodley | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
YOUNG PIONEER, SURVEYOR, AND SOLDIER

THREE years before the Revolution, George Rogers Clark left his father's home to see the great West and perhaps live and find fortune there. He was then a tall, slender, blueeyed youth of nineteen, with clear complexion and sandy hair. In his father's account book these two charges are entered against him:

1772 April 13To Surveyors Instruments: 7. 0. 0.
" "Euclid's elements12. 0.

Thus equipped for surveying, he set out, crossing the Blue Ridge and Alleghenies and descending the Monongahela River to Pittsburg.

Of the young explorer's first venture into the western wilderness nearly all we know appears in the journal of the Reverend David Jones, later a chaplain in Washington's army, who wrote:

'I left Fort Pitt on Tuesday June 9, 1772, in company with George Rogers Clark, a young gentleman from Virginia, who, with several others, inclined to make a tour of this new world. We traveled by water in a canoe, and as I laboured none, I had an opportunity of making my remarks on the many creeks which empty into the Ohio, as also the courses of said river. [Some days later they approached a village inhabited by some mongrel Indians] but as they have a name for plundering canoes we passed them quickly as possible and were so happy as not to be discovered by any of them. . . .[Thirty miles farther down they stopped near the mouth of Grave Creek.] It was in the night when we came; instead of feathers, my bed was gravel stones by the river side. From Fort Pitt to this place we were only in one place where white people live.'1

The explorers continued down the Ohio to the mouth of the Great Kanawha, whence they returned home through the tangle of rugged mountains. Two months later George Rogers, evidently enthusiastic about the western country he had seen, returned there with a young neighbor and a couple of negro slaves. This time his father accompanied him, to see him settled 'on a bottom of fine land on the Ohio, about forty

____________________
1
Draper MSS. 1 L 9; English's Conquest of the Northwest, 60.

-8-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Rogers Clark: His Life and Public Services
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 425

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.