John Lothrop Motley: Representative Selections

By B. T. Schantz; Chester Penn Higby | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE
1814. John Lothrop Motley born at Dorchester (now part of
Boston), April 15.
1824.One summer at the school of Charles W. Greene, near
Boston.
1824-27.Attended the school conducted at Round Hill, North-
ampton, by Joseph S. Cogswell and George Bancroft.
In addition to the usual subjects, he studied the German
language under Bancroft (at that time one of the few
thorough German scholars in the country) and made
some acquaintance with German literature. Displayed
a facility at languages and a great interest in reading.
Somewhat spoiled; a quick but not a diligent student.
1827.Entered Harvard. Stood third in his class as a freshman.
Irresponsible, negligent of his studies, he was rusticated;
worked more soberly after his return to the campus, but
with no effort to attain college rank. Handsome and well
dressed, he appeared haughty in manner and cynical in
mood to those in whom he felt no special interest.
Elected to Phi Beta Kappa by an extension of the rules of
the society.
1831.Graduated from Harvard. Read an essay on Goethe at
the senior exhibition.
1832-33.At the University of Göttingen. Met Bismarck. Im-
proved his knowledge of the German language and
attended lectures on law.
1833.In the autumn, transferred with Bismarck to the Univer-
sity of Berlin, where the two became fellow lodgers.
Motley translated Faust, at least in part, and composed
verses in German. Studied law, applying himself more
diligently to his studies than did most of the German
students.
1834-35.Traveled on the continent and in England.

-cxxxii-

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John Lothrop Motley: Representative Selections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chronological Table cxxxii
  • Selected Bibliography cxxxv
  • Selections From John Lothrop Motley 1
  • Letters 3
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