John Lothrop Motley: Representative Selections

By B. T. Schantz; Chester Penn Higby | Go to book overview

LETTERS

[The letters reprinted here are all taken from The Correspondence of John Lothrop Motley, in two volumes, edited by George William Curtis ( New York: 1889). These two volumes, which constitute an invaluable supplement to Holmes Memoir, furnish an entertaining and instructive survey of Motley's activities from the time of his school days in 1824 to the date of his death in 1877. They have been scored by certain critics on the ground that they include too many letters which represent little more than Motley's delight in the polished social life of England and the Continent; but this was an important phase of his experience, and it is a factor which must not be overlooked in any attempt to estimate his mind and character. An additional volume of letters has been edited by Motley's daughter and her husband, St. Herbert John Mildmay: John Lothrop Motley and His Family ( London: 1910). It includes a number of letters written by Motley's wife and daughters, some additions to the Bismarck-Motley correspondence, and several other letters of some importance. A few letters, published but uncollected, are available (see Bibliography, p. cxxxix, cxlvi, and clvii). Others, however, have been withheld from publication by members of the family and friends, for personal reasons.]


[TO HIS MOTHER]1

Göttingen, July 1st, 1832.

MY DEAR MOTHER,--

. . . There is nothing here to mark out the University, except the Library and the students that you meet in the streets, for

____________________
1
This letter is one of seven in the Correspondence ( I, 14-34) which depict Motley's life at the Universities of Göttingen and Berlin in 1832-34. A comparison of these letters with Book Two of Morton Hope ( 1839), Motley's first novel, will reveal the fashion in which the young author employed autobiographic material in his first creative effort.

-3-

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John Lothrop Motley: Representative Selections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chronological Table cxxxii
  • Selected Bibliography cxxxv
  • Selections From John Lothrop Motley 1
  • Letters 3
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