The Stone Lion and Other Chinese Detective Stories: The Wisdom of Lord Bau

By Mildred Ross; Yetta S. Center et al. | Go to book overview

The True Mother

Hai-tang was fourteen when her father, with no outward sign of illness, suddenly died. The scholarly Jang Yu had paid little attention to matters of money, preferring to spend his time immersed in the books of the great sages. Having failed to lay aside even the smallest sum against adversity, his family was left in dire straits.

To his sixteen-year-old son, Jang Lin, fell the responsibility of providing for his mother and sister, but the boy was ill-prepared to take his place as head of the household. From early childhood he had shown no inclination for learning. Even more disappointing to his parents, Jang Lin was possessed of a selfish, disagreeable nature. Without special skills he was not suited for any occupation other than menial jobs, but he refused any offers that entailed much hard labor for very little pay. Finally he became discouraged and refused to look for work any longer. His widowed mother was beside herself with worry. She and her children faced the prospect of starvation.

With her family's survival threatened, Madam Jang reluctantly, and with a heavy heart, considered a way out of their troubles, a remedy that would have been unthinkable in other circumstances.

" Hai-tang is young and pretty," she reflected. "Men will pay well for her company. The money she can bring home will tide us over until better times." The agonizing decision was made. At

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The Stone Lion and Other Chinese Detective Stories: The Wisdom of Lord Bau
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Millstone Street 3
  • The True Mother 19
  • A Stolen Stallion 37
  • The Stone Lion 53
  • Snow White Goose 71
  • Palace Plot 87
  • The Black Bowl 103
  • Borrowed Clothes 115
  • A Bloody Handprint 133
  • Singsong Girl 149
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