The Stone Lion and Other Chinese Detective Stories: The Wisdom of Lord Bau

By Mildred Ross; Yetta S. Center et al. | Go to book overview

Borrowed Clothes

Jau Heng raised his cup of wine. "I drink to the happy union of our illustrious families."

"And I," countered Shen Lingmou, "am grateful that you deem my daughter worthy of your acceptance. With the help of heaven, may she bring happiness to your household by bearing many sons."

The two men, both prosperous merchants and old acquaintances, had just agreed to the betrothal of their young children. It would be ten years before the prospective bride and groom reached marriageable age, and though they would not meet before their wedding ceremony, they were considered man and wife until death.

The time of youth is fleeting. The day came when Shen, in a pensive mood, marveled how swiftly the years had flown. His frolicsome daughter, Ahwa, had passed her sixteenth birthday. She was a radiant beauty, considered by all to be the prettiest girl in the entire village.

Now Shen had to think seriously about preparations for her marriage. He planned to make Ahwa's wedding feast a most elaborate festive celebration. The guest list would number in the hundreds. Extra servants would be needed to prepare the many delicious foods. In anticipation of the occasion, he had long ago set aside ten jugs of the very best wine to insure the jollity of the merrymakers. All would be in readiness as soon as an auspicious date was determined.

-115-

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The Stone Lion and Other Chinese Detective Stories: The Wisdom of Lord Bau
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Millstone Street 3
  • The True Mother 19
  • A Stolen Stallion 37
  • The Stone Lion 53
  • Snow White Goose 71
  • Palace Plot 87
  • The Black Bowl 103
  • Borrowed Clothes 115
  • A Bloody Handprint 133
  • Singsong Girl 149
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