The Stone Lion and Other Chinese Detective Stories: The Wisdom of Lord Bau

By Mildred Ross; Yetta S. Center et al. | Go to book overview

A Bloody Handprint

Chen Ching mournfully concluded that all the demons of hell had chosen him to be the victim of some devilish prank. How else explain why he was at this moment sitting on the cold stone floor of a foul-smelling prison cell, accused of murdering a holy monk? He tried to turn his head slightly and winced with pain. Because he had dared to protest his innocence while the brutish jailers fumbled clumsily to clamp the cangue* around his neck, he had been cruelly beaten. The purple welts raised by their bamboo rods stung painfully and the wooden collar threatened to choke him. To avoid further agony he forced himself to sit perfectly still. But while his body remained motionless, his mind raced along a thousand paths of remembrance.

Chen recalled leaving his home in high spirits in anticipation of a happy reunion with an old friend. His journey took him a short distance over a well-traveled route before he veered off to a quiet lane that twisted and turned, climbing steadily into the hills. Passing a clump of stunted pines, Chen noticed a weather-beaten wooden tablet with the words TEMPLE OF HEAVENLY LIGHT scratched into its surface. He gave it only a fleeting glance. The weather was pleasant. It was early spring, neither too warm nor too cold, and he continued to stride along briskly.

____________________
*
A wooden collar which confines the neck, and sometimes the hands, used for punishment.

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Stone Lion and Other Chinese Detective Stories: The Wisdom of Lord Bau
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Millstone Street 3
  • The True Mother 19
  • A Stolen Stallion 37
  • The Stone Lion 53
  • Snow White Goose 71
  • Palace Plot 87
  • The Black Bowl 103
  • Borrowed Clothes 115
  • A Bloody Handprint 133
  • Singsong Girl 149
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.