Regional Power Rivalries in the New Eurasia: Russia, Turkey, and Iran

By Alvin Z. Rubinstein; Oles M. Smolansky | Go to book overview

is now the Republic of Tajikistan, had at the end of the nineteenth century until finally falling to Bolshevik intervention in 1920. History seems to repeat itself, but Russian policymakers apparently forget a proverbial axiom: you cannot enter the same waters twice--the 1990s are not the 1920s, when Bolsheviks managed to defeat anticommunist opposition in Central Asia, conquer the Emirate of Bukhara, and drive tens of thousands of Tajiks, Uzbeks, and other Central Asians across the Panj River into Afghanistan. The world has changed dramatically, and the end of the twentieth century is the time of the fall of communism and imperialism and the revival of Islam and the Muslim world.


Notes
1.
Istoriia tadzhikskogo naroda, vol. 2, Moscow, 1964, p. 79.
2.
It is interesting that prior to the breakup of the Soviet Union and the appearance of independent Central Asian states, few people in the Middle East knew about Soviet Central Asia and its peoples. But when the name of Bukhara was mentioned it caused one and the same reaction among both intellectuals and common people: "Oh, Bukhara! Sure, we know. It is the birthplace of Imam al-Bukhari." "As-Sahih" of Imam Ismail al-Bukhari (810-870) has for eleven centuries been the prime and most authentic collection of the Prophet's hadith, sayings, for Sunni Muslims world over, and revered by them as the second most important book next to the Quran.
3.
S. Gretsky, "Qadi Akbar Turajonzoda", Central Asia Monitor, no. 1, 1994, p. 21.
4.
"Polkovnik Nikolai Dyomin: 'Eto voina mezhdunarodnoi mafii,'" Nezavisimaia gazeta, February 9, 1994, p. 3.
5.
After KGB's reorganization into the Foreign Intelligence Service and the Federal Counterintelligence Service, generals Petkel and Tursunov joined the latter, where they head Central Asian operations.
6.
"Chego zhe khochet rossiiskoe pravitel'stvo v Tadzhikistane", Nezavisimaia gazeta, August 25, 1994, p. 3.
7.
Taped interview with Dr. Khudoiberdy Holiqnazarov in Islamabad, Pakistan, on October 27, 1994.
8.
Ibid. It must be noted that out of more than twenty ministers of the Government of National Reconciliation, only three represented the opposition. Thus, in fact, an old government from the Soviet times was preserved intact.
10.
Igor Rotar', "Stat' nashimi satellitami ili umeret'", Nezavisimaia gazeta, May 5, 1994, p. 3.
11.
"International Narcotics Control Strategy Report" ( Washington, DC: U.S. Department of State, 1994), p. 222-23.
12.
Moskovskie novosti, no. 16, April 17-24, 1994, p. A10.
13.
FBIS-SOV-94-119, p. 63; Izvestiia, June 29, 1994.
14.
Izvestiia, February 22, 1994, p. 3.
15.
FBIS-SOV-94-174, p. 47.
16.
Phone conversation with Akbar Turajonzoda, May 15, 1994.
17.
Izvestiia, July 7, 1994, p. 1.
18.
In December 1994, Shodmon Yusuf's chairmanship was suspended at the congress of the Democratic Party in Moscow.
19.
B. Vinogradov, "Prizrak 'vtorogo Afgana,'" Izvestiia, March 3, 1994, p. 3.

-251-

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Regional Power Rivalries in the New Eurasia: Russia, Turkey, and Iran
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About the Editors And Contributors vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note xii
  • Part I- Old Rivals, New Relationships 1
  • 1: The Russian Federation and Turkey 3
  • 2: Moscow and Tehran The Wary Accommodation 26
  • Part II- Cis and Iran 63
  • 3: Ukraine and Iran 65
  • 4: Azerbaijan and Iran 93
  • 5: Iran and Tajikistan 112
  • Part III- The Turkish Factor 145
  • 6: Iran and Turkey Confrontation Across An Ideological Divide 147
  • 7: Turkey and Central Asia Reality Comes Calling 169
  • Part IV A Russian "Monroe Doctrine" In the Making? 199
  • 8: Russia and Transcaucasia The Case of Nagorno-Karabakh 201
  • 9: Russia and Tajikistan 231
  • 10: The Asian Interior The Geopolitical Pull on Russia 252
  • Conclusion 271
  • Index 279
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