Greatness in the White House: Rating the Presidents

By Robert K. Murray; Tim H. Blessing | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

In a project of this nature, the number of persons to be thanked is legion. No reasonable amount of space would permit even the mere listing of the names of those who contributed to this presidential performance study in one way or another. We are especially grateful to the sixty interviewees who spent hours in verbal discourse with us and to the nearly one thousand American historians who took the time to answer our survey questionnaires and return them for analysis. Without the cooperation of these historians, this study would have been impossible.

Apart from these two historian groups, there are a few specific individuals who have our heartfelt thanks. Professor Stanley Weintraub, Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanistic Studies, and Dr. Stanley Paulson, former Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at The Pennsylvania State University, gave psychological and monetary support throughout the period required to secure the data. Robert D. Lee Director for Research in the Institute of Public Administration, and Robert Mowitz (now deceased), Director of the Institute of Public Administration at The Pennsylvania State University, provided advice on sampling techniques and supplied us with specialized personnel to help construct the survey instrument and solve polling problems as they arose. Glen Kreider, Research Application Specialist, and William McCane, Instructional Specialist, both in the Center for Computer Assistance at The Pennsylvania State University, were our contacts for computer-related problems. Historians Philip S. Klein, Warren W. Hassler, Ira V. Brown, Earl Kaylor, and Richard Hatch gave unselfishly of their time to aid us with the historical aspects of the study.

The laborious chores of envelope stuffing, mail sorting, and codification of data would never have been completed without the help of such persons as Robin Floyd, Janet Winters, Kathy Cresswell, Richard Russell, Michael Pavkovic, Su-Ya Chang, Joshua Rosen, and Marilyn Parrish. Shirley Rader, Jan Shoemaker, and especially Carol McGahen cheerfully assumed the burden of typing the manuscript and setting up the many tables and appendixes. Eve Murray's editorial and literary suggestions made the conversion of statistical data into prose read less boring than it might otherwise have been.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Greatness in the White House: Rating the Presidents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 169

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.