A Search for Wisdom and Spirit: Thomas Merton's Theology of the Self

By Anne E. Carr | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Why another book about Thomas Merton? So much has already been written about this man. There have been biographies about his cosmopolitan early life and his dramatic conversion, studies of his work and writing as a monk, analyses of Merton as social critic, essayist, and poet, and as explorer of the world's religious traditions. All these in addition to Merton's own numerous works. Someone has remarked that Merton's books and books about him represent something of a "cottage industry" in our culture as new generations of students, Christian or not, young and old, women and men, newly discover his writing and become "hooked." They are attracted, perhaps, by Merton's spiritual writing or by his autobiographical reflections or his poetry. The sustained, even devoted, interest of so many suggests that this fascination is not just a fad that soon will wear itself out.

But how explain the continuing and compelling attraction to a person who, as a young man, walked away from involvement with the ghetto and its poor, marginalized ones for the beauty and peace of a contemplative monastery in the country? Certainly most religious people today are well aware of the Third World, its poverty and dependence, and acutely conscious too of the "underside" of our own nation. They are repeatedly reminded of their call to collective political, social, and economic action to attend to the needs of the world and to express overtly what Latin American theologians and, more recently, the United States Catholic Bishops have named "the preferential option for the poor."

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Search for Wisdom and Spirit: Thomas Merton's Theology of the Self
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Seeds of the Self 10
  • 2 - Seeking the Spirit: the Christian Inheritance 34
  • 3 - Conjectures at a Turning Point 54
  • 4 - The Wisdom of the Self: Learning from the East 75
  • 5 - I Live Now Not I . . . " 96
  • 6 - The Story of the Self 121
  • Epilogue 141
  • Notes 149
  • Selected Bibliography of Books by Thomas Merton 165
  • Index 167
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 171

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.