A Search for Wisdom and Spirit: Thomas Merton's Theology of the Self

By Anne E. Carr | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1. Cf. e.g., Christopher Lasch, The Culture of Narcissism: American Life in an Age of Diminishing Expectations ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1979); Robert N. Bellah and others, Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985).
2. Cf. Raymond Bailey, Thomas Merton on Mysticism ( New York: Doubleday, 1976), 205; John J. S. J. Higgins, Thomas Merton on Prayer ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1973), 58-64; James Finley, Merton's Palace of Nowhere: A Search for God through Awareness of the True Self ( Notre Dame, Ind.: Ave Maria Press, 1978); William H. Shannon , Thomas Merton's Dark Path: The Inner Experience of a Contemplative ( New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 1981). The latter two books touch on some of the same themes as the present study, but neither places them in an autobiographical framework that shows the development of Merton's thought.
3. Merton ranked his one attempt at writing theology, The Ascent to Truth ( New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1951) as only "fair" among his many books, and once remarked that although he wished he had studied theology with more of the sharpness and precision of the Dominicans, he had some difficulty with their distinctions which, like their traditional colors, were black and white. Cf. Bailey, Mysticism, 255- 256, n. 14 and Merton, The Sign of Jonas ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1953), 208. On Merton's struggle with the thought of Thomas Aquinas, see Bailey, 106 ff., and on his deep admiration for

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A Search for Wisdom and Spirit: Thomas Merton's Theology of the Self
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Seeds of the Self 10
  • 2 - Seeking the Spirit: the Christian Inheritance 34
  • 3 - Conjectures at a Turning Point 54
  • 4 - The Wisdom of the Self: Learning from the East 75
  • 5 - I Live Now Not I . . . " 96
  • 6 - The Story of the Self 121
  • Epilogue 141
  • Notes 149
  • Selected Bibliography of Books by Thomas Merton 165
  • Index 167
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