REFERENCES
For modern accounts of the development of the Malthusian controversy see J. A. Field, Essays on Population ( ed. H. F. Hohmann), Chicago, 1931, Essay 1; and K. Smith, The Malthusian Controversy, London, 1951.
W. Bagehot, Economic Studies ( 1880), p. 139.
Fraser Magazine, a counterblast to the Tory Blackwood's, had a half- century of life from 1830. Its character, content, and history are described in Miriam M. H. Thrall Rebellious Fraser's ( New York, 1934). Its quasi-editor, William Maginn, hated political economy in general, and Malthusianism in particular. "Wedespise those political economists who swallow the jargon of Malthus or MacCulloch with good faith, and pure ignorance of the consequences of the doctrines they preach...we hate, as the enemies of the human race, all those who promulgate such doctrines with a knowledge of what must be the results."
"Erase from your volumes of plutonomic oracles," wrote J. M. Ludlow in 1860, "all those pages and pages which inculcate upon the labouring classes the necessity of the preventive check upon population. What! You bid the workman by disciplining his will, by the severest self-restraint, for the sake of rendering his labour scarce, and therefore of gaining a higher price for it; you bid him, I say, bind down those family instincts which are, in one view, the very safety-valves of society; and you would fain discourage him from endeavouring, by every means which the like discipline and self-restraint can afford, to wring by combination the highest price for his labour without stifling those instincts! ...Of all hypocrisies which this country has seen go forth under high heaven, I know none more insolent than that of modern plutonomy, inculcating the 'prudential check' upon the working man and advocating the unlimited, unregulated introduction of machinery." Article on Trade Societies and the Social Science Association, in Macmillan's Magazine, Vol. 3, 1860-61, pp. 322-3.
Beatrice Webb, in Our Partnership, describes in detail her part in the work of the Poor Law Commission of 1905-9. It is an illuminating reflection of the attitudes that prevailed in these years to the inheritance of the principles of 1834, and of the chief embodiment of Malthusian ideas as they survived in the Charity Organization Society.
British Museum, Add. MSS. 34,617/458b-459. Chadwick to Napier, June 15th, 1836. Chadwick asserted many years later that he had told Malthus, who was surprised at the revelation, of the prevalence of high birth-rates in the areas of high mortalities.
J. R. Coulthart's report, 1844, to the Commissioners for Enquiring into the State of Large Towns and Populous Districts.
Cecil Driver, Tory Radical: The Life of Richard Oastler, New York, 1946, p. 429. In the Fleet Papers, 1841-4, and The Home, 1851-3, Oastler's anti- Malthusian views are fully explicit.
Charles Babbage, On the Economy of Machinery and Manufacturers ( 1832), especially Chapter XVIII, on the Division of Labour. He writes (p. 137), "The master manufacturer, by dividing the work to be executed into different processes, each requiring different degrees of skill and force, can purchase exactly that precise quantity of both which is necessary for each process; whereas, if the whole work were executed by one workman, that person must possess sufficient skill to perform the most difficult, and sufficient strength to execute the most laborious, of the operations into which the art is divided." Hence the increasing search for new and improved methods of production and of the organization of production, and the result of the effects of "large factories" (Ch. XXI), including

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Malthus
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 205

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.