How to Appreciate Motion Pictures: A Manual of Motion-Picture Criticism Prepared for High-School Students

By Edgar Dale | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
PHOTOGRAPHY

To understand the art of the motion picture we must constantly realize that the motion picture is made with a camera. The camera is an all-seeing eye. It can record dramatic action from any point, below the action, above it, beside it, or at any angle. The camera eye can view the object at a distance, or can look at it closely. A great deal of the art of the motion picture lies in the skillful use of camera distance, that is, the distance of the camera from the object to be photographed, and camera angles, that is, the angle at which the action is photographed.

Photography, therefore, creates one of the most difficult problems in motion-picture criticism. Increased understanding of the skill of the cameraman will increase your appreciation of motion-picture production. One must not forget that a motion picture is something that has gone through a camera, something that has been improved by the skill of the cameraman and his director or harmed by the lack of it. As you gain an increased understanding of photography, you will increase your appreciation of motion pictures.


PRINCIPLES OF PHOTOGRAPHY

First of all, what are the principles of photography? Have you ever loaded a kodak? If you have, you know that you put a strip of celluloid film into your camera and adjust it so that when the lever is operated or the bulb is pressed, the film will be exposed. This permits the light coming from

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How to Appreciate Motion Pictures: A Manual of Motion-Picture Criticism Prepared for High-School Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Chapter I- What is Motion-Picture Appreciation? 3
  • Chapter II- Shopping for Your Movies 16
  • Conclusion 24
  • Chapter III- The History of the Movies 26
  • Chapter IV- A Visit to a Studio 37
  • Chapter V- Motion-Picture Reviewing 59
  • Chapter VI- The Story 74
  • Summary of Standards 95
  • Chapter VII- Acting 98
  • Chapter VIII- Photography 121
  • Summary of Standards 149
  • Chapter IX- Settings 151
  • Summary of Standards 169
  • Chapter X- Sound and Music 171
  • Summary of Standards 177
  • Chapter XI- Direction 179
  • Conclusion 204
  • Chapter XII- What Are Motion Pictures For? 205
  • Chapter XIII- What Next? 220
  • Appendix Suggested Readings 233
  • A Glossary of Motion-Picture Vocabulary 235
  • Index 241
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