How to Appreciate Motion Pictures: A Manual of Motion-Picture Criticism Prepared for High-School Students

By Edgar Dale | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION
Why do not the directors turn out better pictures? Is it because they don't care? One person closely connected with the industry says that they do care: "There is not a director in the business who does not hope to have his name go down in motion-picture history as the creator of some great motion picture, but most of them are given a script two weeks before production starts, and are expected to make a box-office picture in 18 or 21 days. It is the producer, and not the director, who is to blame for this."
QUESTIONS FOR REVIEW
Here are some questions that members of the class may wish to ask themselves after they have seen a photoplay. Perhaps those in your group can find other questions which they wish to add, or they may wish to change this list.
1. Did the actors and actresses seem to understand what the play was about?
2. Do you believe the director was able to handle all types of scenes well--comedy, tragedy, farce?
3. Did the picture give evidence of being well edited? If not, what scenes would you have eliminated?
4. Where were scenes needed that were not included?
5. Give some examples of "directorial touches" that were used.
6. What especially noteworthy examples did you see of the use of moving shots? Close-ups? Angle shots?

-204-

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How to Appreciate Motion Pictures: A Manual of Motion-Picture Criticism Prepared for High-School Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Chapter I- What is Motion-Picture Appreciation? 3
  • Chapter II- Shopping for Your Movies 16
  • Conclusion 24
  • Chapter III- The History of the Movies 26
  • Chapter IV- A Visit to a Studio 37
  • Chapter V- Motion-Picture Reviewing 59
  • Chapter VI- The Story 74
  • Summary of Standards 95
  • Chapter VII- Acting 98
  • Chapter VIII- Photography 121
  • Summary of Standards 149
  • Chapter IX- Settings 151
  • Summary of Standards 169
  • Chapter X- Sound and Music 171
  • Summary of Standards 177
  • Chapter XI- Direction 179
  • Conclusion 204
  • Chapter XII- What Are Motion Pictures For? 205
  • Chapter XIII- What Next? 220
  • Appendix Suggested Readings 233
  • A Glossary of Motion-Picture Vocabulary 235
  • Index 241
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