The Spanish Tragedy: A Play

By Thomas Kyd; J. Schick | Go to book overview

SCENE III
The Court of Portugal.
Enter Viceroy, Alexandro, Villuppo.
Vic.Is our ambassador despatch'd for Spain?
Alex.Two days, my liege, are past since his depart.
Vic.And tribute-payment gone along with him?
Alex.Ay, my good lord.
Vic.Then rest we here awhile in our unrest,
And feed our sorrows with some inward sighs;
For deepest cares break never into tears.
But wherefore sit I in a regal throne?
This better fits a wretch's endless moan.
[Falls to the ground.
Yet this is higher than my fortunes reach,10
And therefore better than my state deserves.
Ay, ay, this earth, image of melancholy,
Seeks him whom fates adjudge to misery.
Here let me lie; now am I at the lowest.
Qui jacet in terra, non habet unde cadat.
In me consumpsit vires fortuna nocendo:
Nil superest ut jam possit obesse magis.
Yes, Fortune may bereave me of my crown:
Here, take it now;--let Fortune do her worst,
She will not rob me of this sable weed:20

-13-

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The Spanish Tragedy: A Play
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Dramatis Personæ xliv
  • Act I 1
  • Scene II 5
  • Scene III 13
  • Scene VI 24
  • Act II 25
  • Scene III 33
  • Act III 44
  • Scene II 49
  • Scene III 55
  • Scene V 61
  • Scene XI 76
  • Scene XIII 91
  • Scene XV 100
  • Act IV 108
  • Scene II 116
  • Glossary 133
  • Notes 135
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