The Foreign Service of the United States

By Tracy Hollingsworth Lay; Charles Evans Hughes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
EDUCATION FOR THE FOREIGN SERVICE

A brief sketch of the movement .--Education for the Foreign Service is an old and a persistent topic of discussion. It has been approached from many angles and has formed the subject of several concrete proposals, all of which have contemplated some form of governmental aid.

In other countries there have been notable achievements of this character, particularly in France, where the diplomatic disasters of 1870 led to the founding of the École Libre des Sciences Politiques;1 in Germany where, "as a result of the diplomatic defeats in this war a scheme for an Auslands Hoch-Schule has been revived, and is being realized in Berlin"; and in England where "as a result of our (the British) diplomatic discomfitures in the early part of the war, a movement was started by liberal parliamentarians for a School of Foreign Affairs in London."2

____________________
1
"The French École Libre des Sciences Politiques furnishes an admirable course in preparation for the Foreign Service. Although the candidates who take the Government examinations receive no credit for their attendance at the school, nevertheless it is only exceptionally that a man enters the Service without the preparation which it affords. More recently another school, established in Paris, trains men for these examinations, and the rivalry between the two is stimulating. In the diplomatic section of the École Libre des Sciences Politiques, which offers a training for diplomats and consuls, will be found young men from all parts of the world who have come to prepare themselves for the foreign service of their own country. The École Libre, presided over by a remarkable group of teachers, has carried French influence to all parts of the world. It would be of great advantage to this country if similar institutions could be established at the capital or in some of our principal cities."--National Civil Service Reform League, "Report on the Foreign Service" ( 1919), p. 31.
2
George Young, "Diplomacy Old and New", p. 98.

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