CHAPTER VI
THE QUESTION OF TITLE

A DISCUSSION of Lowe's character inevitably raises other questions: the nature of the grievances of which Napoleon complained, and the amount of responsibility for those grievances justly attaching to the Governor. The grievances may be ranged under three heads: those relating to title, to finance, and to custody. Of these the question of title is by far the most important, for it was not merely the source of half the troubles of the captivity, but it operated as an almost absolute bar to intercourse and as an absolute veto on what might have been an amicable discussion of other grievances.

We have set forth at length the ill-advised note in which Lowe asked Napoleon to dinner. It was, in any case, a silly thing to do, but the Governor must have known that there was one phrase in it which would certainly prevent Napoleon's noticing it; for in it he was styled "GeneralBonaparte." Napoleon regarded this as an affront. When he had first landed on the island, Cockburn had sent him an invitation to a ball directed to "GeneralBonaparte." On receiving it through Bertrand, Napoleon had remarked to the Grand Marshal, "Send this card to General Bonaparte; the last I heard of him was at the Pyramids and Mount Tabor."

But, as a rule, he did not treat this matter so lightly. It was not, he said, that he cared particularly for the title of Emperor, but that when his right to it was challenged, he was bound to maintain it. We cannot

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Napoleon, the Last Phase
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter I - THE LITERATURE 1
  • Chapter II - LAS CASES, ANTOMMARCHI, AND OTHERS 8
  • Chapter III - GOURGAUD 34
  • Chapter IV - THE DEPORTATION 57
  • Chapter V - SIR HUDSON LOWE 66
  • Chapter VI - THE QUESTION OF TITLE 77
  • Chapter VII - THE MONEY QUESTION 92
  • Chapter VIII - THE QUESTION OF CUSTODY 98
  • Chapter IX - LORD BATHURST 116
  • Chapter X - THE DRAMATIS PRERSONÆ 123
  • Chapter XI - THE COMMISSIONERS 136
  • Chapter XII - THE EMPEROR AT HOME 149
  • Chapter XIII - THE CONVERSATIONS OF NAPOLEON 163
  • Chapter XIV - THE SUPREME REGRETS 197
  • Chapter XV - NAPOLEON AND THE DEMOCRACY 206
  • Chapter XVI - THE END 217
  • Appendix 253
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.