APPENDIX

1. CAPTAIN MAITLAND

NAPOLEON BUONAPARTE, when he came on board the Bellerophon, on the 15th of July 1815, wanted exactly one month of completing his forty-sixth year, being born the 15th August 1769. He was then a remarkably strong, well-built man, about five feet seven inches high, his limbs particularly well formed, with a fine ankle and very small foot, of which he seemed rather vain, as he always wore while on board the ship, silk stockings, and shoes. His hands were also very small, and had the plumpness of a woman's rather than the robustness of a man's. His eyes light grey, teeth good; and when he smiled, the expression of his countenance was highly pleasing; when under the influence of disappointment, however, it assumed a dark gloomy cast. His hair was of a very dark brown, nearly approaching to black, and, though a little thin on the top and front, had not a grey hair amongst it. His complexion was a very uncommon one, being of a light sallow Colour, differing from almost any other I ever met with. From his having become corpulent, he had lost much of his personal activity, and, if we are to give credit to those who attended him, a very considerable portion of his mental energy was also gone. . . . His general appearance was that of a man rather older than he then was. His manners were extremely pleasing and affable: he joined in every conversation, related numerous anecdotes, and endeavoured, in every way to promote good humour: he even admitted his attendants to great familiarity; and I saw one or two instances of their contradicting him in the most direct terms, though they generally treated him with much respect. He possessed, to a wonderful degree, a facility in making a favourable impression upon those with whom he entered into conversation: this appeared to me to be accomplished by turning the subject to matters he supposed the person he was addressing was well acquainted with, and on which he could show himself to advantage.

-253-

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Napoleon, the Last Phase
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter I - THE LITERATURE 1
  • Chapter II - LAS CASES, ANTOMMARCHI, AND OTHERS 8
  • Chapter III - GOURGAUD 34
  • Chapter IV - THE DEPORTATION 57
  • Chapter V - SIR HUDSON LOWE 66
  • Chapter VI - THE QUESTION OF TITLE 77
  • Chapter VII - THE MONEY QUESTION 92
  • Chapter VIII - THE QUESTION OF CUSTODY 98
  • Chapter IX - LORD BATHURST 116
  • Chapter X - THE DRAMATIS PRERSONÆ 123
  • Chapter XI - THE COMMISSIONERS 136
  • Chapter XII - THE EMPEROR AT HOME 149
  • Chapter XIII - THE CONVERSATIONS OF NAPOLEON 163
  • Chapter XIV - THE SUPREME REGRETS 197
  • Chapter XV - NAPOLEON AND THE DEMOCRACY 206
  • Chapter XVI - THE END 217
  • Appendix 253
  • Index 257
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