College Athletes for Hire: The Evolution and Legacy of the NCAA's Amateur Myth

By Allen L. Sack; Ellen J. Staurowsky | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is not intended to be a history of collegiate sport. We believe, however, that any attempt to formulate social policy has to be set in a historical context. Our treatment of the early years of male and female collegiate sport owes a great deal to others whose histories of both collegiate sport and women's physical education served as our starting point, including Pearl Berlin, Susan Cahn, Jack Falla, Jan Felshin, Ellen Gerber, Joan Hult, Mabel Lee, Carole Oglesby, Benjamen Rader, Ron Smith, Adryn Sponberg, John Thelin, Waneen Wyrick, and Patricia Vertinsky.

We owe a very special note of gratitude to sport historian Ron Smith for graciously allowing us to use notes and documents that he has been painstakingly collecting from university archives for over the past twenty years. Of particular relevance to our work was material that Professor Smith shared with us from presidential papers in the university libraries at Brown, Harvard, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Georgia Tech, Stanford, and the University of Virginia.

This project could not have been undertaken and completed without the support of our respective institutions. We would like to thank the University of New Haven for the support it provided through its sabbatical leave and summer research programs, as well as the Ithaca College Instructional Development Program. We would like to acknowledge the generous assistance of archivists and reference librarians from the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women Archives at the University of Maryland, the Constance Applebee papers at Bryn Mawr College, the Cornell University Archives, the

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