College Athletes for Hire: The Evolution and Legacy of the NCAA's Amateur Myth

By Allen L. Sack; Ellen J. Staurowsky | Go to book overview

Athletic Scholarships for
Women: The Complexities of
Intercollegiate Athletic Equality

From bloomers to spandex shorts, from Basquette to prime-time basketball, and from three dribbles to powering to the hoop, signs of the remarkable changes wrought in women's sport over the past 100 years can be found in virtually every aspect of American society. For the generation of men and women born in the decades of the 1970s and 1980s who have witnessed the emergence of the American Basketball League, the Colorado Silver Bullets, and the Women's National Basketball Association, the notion that women's professional sport prospects were once largely restricted to tennis and golf seems unbelievable.1 Perhaps even more remote is the idea that less than 25 years ago athletically gifted girls, could not aspire to earn athletic scholarships because those kinds of scholarships simply did not exist for women.

In 1997, as women comprise 37 percent of college athletes and are the recipients of over $212 million dollars of athletic scholarship money nationally, the absence of athletic scholarships for women appears almost unthinkable.2 And yet, there was a time not so long ago when the leadership of women's athletics thoroughly opposed such awards because they believed athletic scholarships to be a form of student exploitation and educational irresponsibility. To examine and reflect on the rationale behind their opposition to athletic scholarships and how that opposition fit within the overall evolution of women's intercollegiate athletics on college campuses reveal a great deal about the educational and philosophical dilemmas posed by the effective professionalization of both female and male student athletes.

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
College Athletes for Hire: The Evolution and Legacy of the NCAA's Amateur Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.