Global America: Imposing Liberalism on a Recalcitrant World

By David Mosler; Bob Catley | Go to book overview

Preface

Underpinning [our security] vision is the essential requirement that America remain engaged in world affairs, to influence the actions of others--friends and foes--who can affect our national well-being. Today, there are some who would have us pull back from the world, forgetting the central lesson of this century: that when America neglects the problems of the world, the world often brings its problems to America's doorstep.

U.S. Secretary of Defense, William Cohen,
to the Commonwealth Club of California, 21 July 1997

This is a book born out of the post-industrial transformation of the world economy by what is commonly known as globalization: the creation of a worldwide structure of cultural, social, political, and economic networks that dominate movements of capital and information around the world as never before in human history. At the centre of this global system is the sole superpower and hegemon, the United States of America. It is the origin of this historical pattern and its future that is the central topic of this book.

Since the end of the cold war, the United States has become progressively more open and aggressive about its pursuit of a liberal world order which it would dominate. In 1998 it used its control over the financial markets and institutions to pursue the reconstruction of the once Asian miracle, now Asian meltdown, states as liberal democracies. In 1999 it used the Kosovo War and NATO to expand the membership of NATO and extend its function from that of a regional collective security defensive alliance to that of an embryonic global

-xiii-

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Global America: Imposing Liberalism on a Recalcitrant World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Considerations of American Power 1
  • 2 - Popular Culture, Corporate Power, Imperial State 31
  • 3 - Domestic Constraints on American Power 61
  • 4 - U.S. Policy in the Middle East 83
  • 5 - Policy in Europe 95
  • 6 - U.S. Policy in the Asia Pacific 123
  • 7 - Challenges to U.S. Hegemony 153
  • 8 - Prospects for the Twenty-First Century 181
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 216
  • About the Authors 226
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