Japan: Industrial Power of Asia

By Robert B. Hall | Go to book overview

IX Trade

JAPAN'S unexpected and sudden re-emergence to a position of major prominence among the world's nations after a postwar period of international oblivion is due mostly to its economic recovery and the extraordinary growth of its industry and technology. These have enabled Japan again to claim its place as one of the first-rank trading powers. Japanese goods are finding markets all over the globe from Canada to Argentina, from Morocco to South Africa, from Scandinavia to the Mediterranean, from eastern Europe to Communist China, and from Korea through monsoon Asia to the Middle East, as well as in Australia and New Zealand. "Made in Japan" now appears on television sets, transistor radios, clothing, plywood, and hundreds of other items in the United States; sewing machines, television sets, and fountain pens in Peru; automobiles and machinery in Afghanistan, the Republic of the Sudan, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait; cameras, binoculars, and toys in West Germany and the United Kingdom; scientific and optical instruments in Sweden; film, precision instruments and textiles in the Soviet Union; tractors and ships in Nationalist China; and steel, machinery, automobiles and trucks, and fertilizers in south and southeast Asia.

Japan's businessmen and trading missions are flying all over the world searching for markets and raw materials, and increasing numbers of foreign trading missions are coming to Tokyo to seek out Japanese business. Groups from Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina, and Italy, among many others, have been recent visitors to Japan as its importance in international trade and industry continues to grow. Japanese technology and capital are going out around

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Japan: Industrial Power of Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Van Nostrand Searchlight Books *
  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 3
  • Contents 5
  • I Japan to Day 7
  • II- The Empire 17
  • III - The Land and The Agricultural Revolution 23
  • Iv Fisheries and Forests 38
  • Materials for Industry 43
  • Vi Industrial Miracle 54
  • Vii Urban-Industrial Society 71
  • Viii Population 85
  • Ix Trade 93
  • Xpolitical Relations 108
  • Xi Conclusions 121
  • Some Suggested Readings 124
  • Index 125
  • Van Nostrand Searchlight Books 129
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