Évvoia

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Évvoia

Évvoia (ĕv´ēä) or Euboea (yōōbē´ə), island (1991 pop. 205,502), 1,467 sq mi (3,800 sq km), SE Greece, separated from Boeotia and Attica on the Greek mainland by the Évripos strait. Khalkís is the main city and the administrative center. Évvoia is the largest of the Greek islands after Crete. The island is generally mountainous with fertile valleys; the highest points are Mt. Delphi (c.5,725 ft/1,745 m) and Mt. Oche (c.4,590 ft/1,400 m). Sheep, goats, and cattle are raised, and olives, grapes, and wheat are grown. Magnesite and lignite are mined, and marble is quarried. The island was settled by Ionian and Thracian colonists and was divided among seven independent cities, of which Khalkís and Eretria were the most important. Powerful and prosperous by the 8th cent. BC, these cities established colonies in Macedonia, S Italy, and Sicily. The island was under the hegemony of Athens from 506 to 411 BC and was taken (c.338 BC) by Philip II of Macedon. It was annexed by Rome in 194 BC and later passed under Byzantine rule. As a result of the Fourth Crusade, it became (early 13th cent.) a colony of Venice. It was ceded to the Ottoman Turks in 1470. The island rebelled against the Turks in 1821 and in 1830 was incorporated into Greece. Its name in the Middle Ages was Negropont [black bridge], for the bridge connecting Khalkís with the mainland.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Évvoia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.