Mecklenburg–West Pomerania

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Mecklenburg–West Pomerania

Mecklenburg–West Pomerania (mĕk´lənbŏŏrkh pämərā´nēə), state (1994 pop. 1,890,000), 9,201 sq mi (23,838 sq km), NE Germany, bordering on the Baltic Sea. Schwerin is the capital. The region embraced by the state of Mecklenburg–West Pomerania is a low-lying, fertile agricultural area, with many lakes and forests. Until the end of World War II it was characterized by great estates and farms, but after 1945 the region was divided into innumerable small farms. On the Baltic coast are the cities of Rostock, Wismar, and Stralsund, long important as Hanseatic ports, and the island of Rügen. (Rügen and Stralsund were formerly in Pomerania.) The region of Mecklenburg was occupied (6th cent. AD) by the Wends. Later awarded as a march to the dukes of Saxony, it was subdued (12th cent.) by Henry the Lion, and the Wendish prince Pribislaw became a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire. In 1348 the princes were raised to ducal rank. In 1621 the duchy divided into Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Güstrow, but during the Thirty Years War both dukes were deposed (1628) and the entire duchy was given to Wallenstein, the imperial general, who had conquered it. However, it was retaken by Gustavus II of Sweden and restored (1631) to its former rulers. The line of Mecklenburg-Güstrow died out in 1701, and the line of Mecklenburg-Strelitz took its place. At the Congress of Vienna both divisions of Mecklenburg were raised (1815) to grand duchies. They both joined the German Confederation, sided with Prussia in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, and joined the German Empire at its founding in 1871. The grand dukes were deposed in 1918. In 1934 the separate states of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz were united. As constituted in 1947 under Soviet military occupation, Mecklenburg consisted of the former states of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and of that part of the former Prussian province of Pomerania situated W of the Oder River (but not including Stettin). From 1952, when Mecklenburg's status as a state was abolished, until shortly before German reunification in 1990, the region was divided into the East German districts of Schwerin, Rostock, and Neubrandenburg. The reconstituted state has been known as in German as Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mecklenburg–West Pomerania
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.