Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour

Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan, 1842–1900, English composer, famous for a series of brilliant comic operas written in collaboration with the librettist W. S. Gilbert. As a boy he sang in the choir of the Chapel Royal. He was the first holder of the Mendelssohn scholarship at the Royal Academy of Music, entitling him to study at the Leipzig Conservatory, where he composed the incidental music to Shakespeare's Tempest, produced in 1862. Sullivan became organist at St. Michael's, London, in 1861 and professor of composition at the Royal Academy of Music in 1866. His first comic opera, Cox and Box, appeared in 1867. In 1871 he began his long and successful collaboration with Gilbert. Their first important satirical operetta, Trial by Jury (1875), was followed by even greater triumphs, such as H. M. S. Pinafore (1878), The Pirates of Penzance (1879), Patience (1881), Iolanthe (1882), Princess Ida (1884), The Mikado (1885), Ruddigore (1887), The Yeoman of the Guard (1888), and The Gondoliers (1889). These were produced by Richard D'Oyly Carte, who in 1881 built the Savoy Theater in London expressly for the production of works by Gilbert and Sullivan. Sullivan brought to Gilbert's witty lyrics a wealth of melodic invention and orchestral ingenuity, creating light operas that have charmed audiences for many generations. Despite the success of the comic operas, Sullivan felt that his best work was his serious music, chiefly his oratorios—which include Kenilworth (1864), The Prodigal Son (1869), The Light of the World (1873), and The Golden Legend (1886)—and his serious opera Ivanhoe (1891). He composed many songs, among which "The Lost Chord" (1878) became very popular; hymns, including "Onward, Christian Soldiers" (1871); anthems; ballets; and dramatic music. He was also noted as a conductor. In addition to performances of the operettas, he conducted the London Philharmonic Orchestra, 1885–87, and the Leeds Festivals, 1880–98. When the National Training School for Music was organized (1876), he became its principal, remaining in that position until 1881. Although he and Gilbert were ideally suited as collaborators, their different temperaments caused quarrels and eventual separation in about 1896.

See biography by H. Sullivan and Sir Newman Flower (2d ed. 1952); studies by G. Hughes (1960, repr. 1973), P. Young (1971), and C. Williams (2010).

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sullivan, Sir Arthur Seymour
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.