Watertown

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.

Watertown

Watertown:1 Town (1990 pop. 20,456), Litchfield co., W Conn.; set off from Waterbury and inc. 1780. Textiles, plastics, chemicals, mattresses, and brass goods are among its manufactures. A method for processing silk thread developed there (1849) led to the foundation of a major silk industry in the 19th cent. The Taft School, a coeducational preparatory school, is in Watertown.

2 Town (1990 pop. 33,284), Middlesex co., E Mass., on the Charles River; settled 1630, inc. 1785. An industrial suburb of Boston, it has food processing and the manufacture of machinery, electronic equipment, precision instruments, clothing, plastics, and rubber products. A federal arsenal, built in 1816, was greatly enlarged during the two world wars; most of it is owned by the town, but the U.S. government has retained a section for research. The Perkins School for the Blind (est. in Boston 1829) moved to Watertown in 1912.

3 City (1990 pop. 29,429), seat of Jefferson co., N N.Y., on the Black River, in a dairy region; settled c.1800, inc. as a city 1869. The falls on the river (more than 100 ft/30 m high) provide power for its many industries. Papermaking machinery, foundry and die castings, irrigation equipment, electric motors, railroad equipment, and high-pressure aircraft hydraulic systems are among the city's manufactures. Watertown also attracts tourists as a result of its proximity to Canada, the Adirondacks, and the Thousand Islands resort area. A county historical museum is in the city. Fort Drum, home of the U.S. Army's 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) and an air force station are nearby.

4 City (1990 pop. 17,592), seat of Codington co., NE S.Dak., on the Big Sioux River; inc. 1885. It is the distribution, shipping, and trading center for an extensive agricultural area. There is turkey processing and the manufacture of transportation equipment, polyurethane foam and fiberglass products, and agricultural machinery. Tourism also contributes to Watertown's economy. Two large lakes adjoining the city provide recreation.

5 Industrial city (1990 pop. 19,142), Dodge and Jefferson counties, SE Wis., at the falls of the Rock River; inc. 1854. It is a major rail junction. There is food processing, metal recycling, and diverse manufacturing, including electronics, furnaces, fiberglass, plastics, and hardware. Carl Schurz lived there. His wife, Margarethe, established (1856) the first U.S. kindergarten there; it has been restored and moved to the grounds of the Octagon House (c.1849), the city's historical museum.

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