Regression Modeling Strategies: With Applications to Linear Models, Logistic Regression, and Survival Analysis. (Book Reviews)

By Rao, Sunil J. | Journal of the American Statistical Association, March 2003 | Go to article overview

Regression Modeling Strategies: With Applications to Linear Models, Logistic Regression, and Survival Analysis. (Book Reviews)


Rao, Sunil J., Journal of the American Statistical Association


Frank E. HARRELL, JR. New York: Springer-Verlag, 2001.

ISBN 0-387-95232-2. xii + 568 pp. S79.95 (H).

Predictive modeling has received renewed focus in applied statistics in the last 10-15 years, with the advent of a wealth of new techniques. Our toolbox has increased in weight considerably. Yet bringing all of these ideas together has meant searching through a broad range of literature--often outside of statistics. While some advances in this area have been made (e.g., Hastie, Tibshirani, and Friedman 2001; Ripley 1996; Hastie and Tibshirani 1990), the focus has been much more on explaining what the different techniques are rather than how best to use them and when.

Frank Harrell has long been known as someone who has brought intelligent modeling tools to the masses through his broad range of S-PLUS-based freeware. Many applied statistics and biostatistics departments make regular use of his software. Now Harrell has gone a step further with Regression Modeling Strategies. As the title indicates, this is not simply a book about describing modem techniques and subtle modeling issues, but more a book about strategies for better gleaning structure from data. The meat of the book centers around Chapters 2-4, which introduce a myriad of recently developed techniques. These techniques include flexible modeling (with spline models, tree-based models, and kinds of shrinkage to relax and test the more strict assumptions of linear regression models), dealing with missing data, validating models through resampling methods (including some discussion on the limitations of these methods), and using data-reduction strategies (which are becoming all the more important with the emergence of extremely high-dimensional data such as DNA microarray data). In addition, more subtle issues, like overfitting and effective degrees of freedom, are addressed.

Harrell spends a fair amount of space describing how an honest assessment of model fit should be made and explaining that some price must be paid for the increased flexibility that modern methods bring. He also drives home points through the use of innovative graphics--not only to explore datasets, but to also creatively summarize and validate model fits. Chapters 3 and 4 conclude nicely with detailed summary guidelines on how to bring the various ideas together to develop modeling strategies.

The remaining chapters illustrate how one might approach various data analyses by modeling multivariable data with a continuous response, binary response, ordinal response, and failure-time response. Each task is accompanied by a preliminary chapter as background to better prepare the reader for these paradigm shifts, as well as detailed casestudy analyses with extensive explanations of software syntax (most often in S-PLUS). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Regression Modeling Strategies: With Applications to Linear Models, Logistic Regression, and Survival Analysis. (Book Reviews)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.