Quantum Dynamo Power Chairs. (Special Advertising Section)

The Exceptional Parent, April 2002 | Go to article overview

Quantum Dynamo Power Chairs. (Special Advertising Section)


Let Children Enjoy Life to the Fullest

Dubbed "the power chair for playing," the Quantum Dynamo power chair line is giving children the opportunity to simply be children, sometimes for the first time in their lives.

Manufactured by Quantum Rehab, a division of Pride Mobility Products Corp., the Quantum Dynamo power chair line serves the needs of children with varying disabilities, focusing on a child's desire to be an active member of his family and circle of friends.

While the Quantum Dynamo offers many features that allow for easy maneuverability in the home, at school or on the playground, parents and children prefer the Dynamo for its non-medical, aesthetically pleasing design, outstanding indoor and outdoor performance, and the variety of vibrant, child-friendly colors available.

"The Quantum Dynamo line takes away the stigma of being in a power chair," says Scott Higley, National Sales Manager, Quantum Rehab. "The Dynamo's design and performance capabilities allow children to keep up with friends in a variety of environments, from the tight corners of the classroom to the playground and ball field."

Positive Outcomes Thanks to the Quantum Dynamo Line

Luke, a young boy with muscular dystrophy, experiences the benefits of using a Quantum Dynamo every day. Thanks to the Dynamo he affectionately named "Buzz," Luke is able to play soccer and other sports with his brother and friends. Luke's mother, Diane, sees the positive impact this power chair has on her young son's life, returning him to his happy, easygoing personality. "It allows him to be a kid again," she says.

Craig, a six-year old boy from the Washington, D.C. area, was diagnosed with type III osteogenesis imperfecta, a debilitating bone disease. During his first power chair evaluation at the Hospital for Sick Children in Washington, the seating clinic therapists recommended that Craig try out a Quantum Dynamo power chair. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Quantum Dynamo Power Chairs. (Special Advertising Section)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.