Film Chat: Chow Yun-Fat - CHOWING THE FAT; HOW EASTERN HERO CHOW YUN-FAT CAME TO HOLD THE WEST HOSTAGE. BY ANNA DAY

The Mirror (London, England), April 18, 2003 | Go to article overview

Film Chat: Chow Yun-Fat - CHOWING THE FAT; HOW EASTERN HERO CHOW YUN-FAT CAME TO HOLD THE WEST HOSTAGE. BY ANNA DAY


Byline: ANNA DAY

The rags to riches rise of Hong Kong-born movie hero Chow Yun-Fat is a real-life fairytale. He grew up in a humble house with no electricity, and would get up at 4am every day to work with his vegetable farmer mother before going to school. Nowadays, he has 85 films under his belt, millions in the bank and enjoys the Hollywood lifestyle. Yet despite his fame and fortune he remains down to earth and grateful that - in LA at least - he can walk around without being mobbed by fans.

"In my homeland I am a movie legend," says Yun-Fat, whose latest film, Bulletproof Monk, is released today. "But in America I can pretend I'm a normal person. I don't have stalkers and people asking for autographs all the time."

But all that could be about to change. The multi-Oscar winning Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon brought him to the attention of Hollywood and now Bulletproof Monk should raise his profile even more.

In the action thriller, Yun-Fat plays a Tibetan kung fu master - The Monk With No Name. He has spent 60 years roaming the Earth protecting a precious scroll which holds the key to unlimited power. He then begins searching for a keeper who is worthy to succeed him.

The film is another milestone in a career which has taken him from a varied acting past in his homeland to a position of genuine respect in Hollywood. And he credits his wife Jasmine for pushing him to make the move West when the Asian film industry started to run out of funds.

"My career here is a happy accident," says Yun-Fat, 47. "I didn't even want to come to America - it was my wife who wanted to go to Hollywood. I was forced by her. She's superwoman, but I have corrupted her with credit cards. We love it here."

The couple met in 1984 and married two years later. His third wife, Jasmine became Yun-Fat's business manager soon after they wed, guiding him to ever bigger pay-days as he climbed his way up Tinseltown's star ladder. They now divide their time between their Hollywood mansion and a pounds 6 million pile in Kowloon, where his elderly mother lives.

His mum was left to raise four children single-handedly when Chow's father, an oil rigger, died in 1973. The family's daily life was a struggle, but those past hardships only fuelled his desire to succeed. On leaving school at 17, Chow took on a variety of jobs - all of which have since proved an invaluable source of experience when it comes to his film roles. "If I play a taxi driver, I know what to do because I've been one," he says.

Soon after his father's death, Yun-Fat was accepted into a young actors' training programme underwritten by the Hong Kong television station TVB. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Film Chat: Chow Yun-Fat - CHOWING THE FAT; HOW EASTERN HERO CHOW YUN-FAT CAME TO HOLD THE WEST HOSTAGE. BY ANNA DAY
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.