Teaching Method Facing Review in Duval; Direct Instruction's Scripted Format Has Advocates, Foes

By Garza, Cynthia L. | The Florida Times Union, April 19, 2003 | Go to article overview

Teaching Method Facing Review in Duval; Direct Instruction's Scripted Format Has Advocates, Foes


Garza, Cynthia L., The Florida Times Union


Byline: Cynthia L. Garza, Times-Union staff writer

About 9 a.m., the kindergarten through second grade students of Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary in Northwest Jacksonville were doing pretty much the same thing: word attack.

Kindergarten teacher Janet Szlosek rocked in her chair with her pointer finger working its way down the flip chart balanced on her lap. The students sat on the floor, leaned forward, ready to spell out and say the word.

Szlosek was using a teaching method known as direct instruction.

The program, used in 15 Duval County elementary schools, has been the target of controversy for the past five years. Talk of which reading programs best suit the lowest achieving students in the school system has resurged, now with a push for expansion -- and support -- of the direct instruction program for all of the school system's lowest-performing students in reading.

Direct instruction is a structured approach originally designed in the 1960s to accelerate the learning of at-risk students. The program follows a leveled sequence to teach the student at the fastest possible pace. Lesson plans are followed explicitly by teachers and students cannot move forward without first mastering skills at their level.

As Szlosek applied the method, when a student stumbled on a word, she stopped the momentum picked up in the lesson to correct the pronunciation error. She then picked up where she stopped.

School Board member Brenda Priestly Jackson is leading the discussion about the reading programs with Superintendent John Fryer and his staff. The full School Board is expected to talk about direct instruction during its June meeting, according to Chairwoman Kris Barnes.

The 1998 introduction of the direct instruction program into some of the school system's lowest-performing schools coincided with the hiring of Fryer, who initiated a standards-based model for teaching children to read. That model identifies standards for the student but the teaching method can vary among teachers.

Since then, the two programs have been pitted against each other.

The Interchurch Coalition for Action, Reconciliation and Empowerment, a group of 35 churches that support changes in citywide quality-of-life issues, presented a 1,200-signature petition at this month's School Board meeting that asked for an expansion and support of the program. The group has pushed for the use of direct instruction in public schools for the past five years.

Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary has used direct instruction for more than five years -- before the program tug-of-war began. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Teaching Method Facing Review in Duval; Direct Instruction's Scripted Format Has Advocates, Foes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.