Music: Arts Editor

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 2, 2003 | Go to article overview

Music: Arts Editor


Byline: Hannah Jones

# I was never one of those kids with posters of pop stars on my wall. Not that I didn't like the Bay City Rollers or want to be Suzi Quatro, mind you.

But, for years I was convinced I was the love child of Purdy from the New Avengers and Jimmy Osmond. Don't ask, but I think it had something to do with my pageboy hair cut and my love of the song Long Haired Lover From Liverpool.

Also, while other friends of mind hankered after looking like Kim Wilde, I was just far too busy trying to sound like her - you know, like you had the flu.

But if someone told me I could skip a few meals so that I could get that Sandra Dee look - the black-clad vixen one Olivia Newton-John had going on at the end of Grease - I would have gladly given up my Desperate Dan-sized plates of steak and chips at Chez Jones for a while.

Now let me get this clear.

I'm not advocating that every bright young wannabe should skip meals to look like their idea of perfection.

But surely there's nothing wrong with a little bit of dreaming?

Take Atomic Kitten's Natasha Hamilton for instance.

The poor girl sparked one hell of a fury among parents and dieticians when she claimed the secret to her slim figure was not eating three meals a day. Big wow.

The newly-crowned Rear of the Year was recently asked how she got her figure back so quickly after the birth of her son Joshua last August.

With fans clinging to her every word she honestly responded, ``That's easy, I just don't eat. That's how I've done it. The way to a nice backside is not to eat.''

Although a spokesman for Atomic Kitten later said the 20-year-old singer's remark had been intended as a joke and she had corrected herself by saying her figure was down to a fast metabolism, her ill-judged comment caused outrage among watching parents. …

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