Lowri Turner's Column: Poor Ginola. but Then He Is French

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 2, 2003 | Go to article overview

Lowri Turner's Column: Poor Ginola. but Then He Is French


Byline: Lowri Turner

DAVID Ginola is used to having women throwing themselves at him. After his latest comments, however, he might have to get used to them lobbing other things in his direction: rotten tomatoes, wet sponges, derision. Suggestions on a postcard please.

Ginola says that when he arrived in the UK he was shocked by the behaviour of the flower of our womanhood, his principal complaint being that we drink to excess.

``I saw vomiting in the streets,'' he says. ``It's disgusting the way the women here behave.''

Now I'm partial to the odd glass of Chardonnay myself, but I don't think lining them up on the bar until you are sick is attractive in either sex.

Amazingly, the vast majority of British women agree. We aren't all bent over the gutter at the end of an evening, David.

It makes you wonder where Mr Ginola has been socialising. Instead of characterising all British women as drunken tarts - oh, yes, he also thinks we are sexually loose - perhaps he ought to change his local.

Monsieur Ginola goes on to compare British women with their French counterparts. Of Gallic girls he says, ``The women only drink a little, because they have to drive their husbands home.''

It was at this point while reading his comments that I felt a strange sensation - oh, yes, it was steam coming out of his ears. But then I decided to pity him instead.

Ginola comes from a culture, French, that considers itself terribly sophisticated, except where the relationship between the sexes is concerned. Then it's in the Dark Ages.

Let's not forget it's the country whose President Francois Mitterrand not only had an affair but fathered a love child, and people barely turned a hair.

And talking of infidelity, David Ginola hasn't always been as horrified by British women as he appears to be now. …

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