Final Tests Find No Nerve Agents in Iraqi Chemical

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 2, 2003 | Go to article overview

Final Tests Find No Nerve Agents in Iraqi Chemical


Byline: Guy Taylor, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

TIKRIT, Iraq - Military officials yesterday said suspicious 55-gallon drums found in northern Iraq do not contain a chemical agent used to make weapons of mass destruction, nullifying earlier field tests that indicated nerve agents were present.

The fluid "appears to be a component of a liquid rocket fuel" that showed up in multiple tests as false positives of nerve and mustard agents, said Maj. Dean Thurmond, a spokesman for the Army's V Corps.

The drums were not holding a "weaponized chemical," Maj. Thurmond said.

Officials with the Army's 4th Infantry Division, the first to announce that initial tests on the drums were positive for chemicals used to make weapons of mass destruction, now say they are not able to comment because the matter is being handled by V Corps.

On several occasions since Saddam Hussein's regime was toppled, military officials have announced the potential discovery of unconventional weapons, only to have initial tests of the findings shot down by more intensive investigation.

Before the war, President Bush aggressively argued the need to strip Saddam of chemical and biological weapons and any remaining elements of a nuclear-weapons program, which Mr. Bush said were being hidden from United Nations weapons inspectors.

Military officials have said their field testing equipment is designed to err on the side of caution to protect soldiers in combat.

Maj. Thurmond said the fuel component inside the 55-gallon drums contained a derivative of the sarin chemical.

While the derivative is not used to make nerve agent, it evidently caused field testing equipment to turn up the false positives.

The Washington Times first reported Sunday that a 4th Infantry reconnaissance unit had secured the site where the 14 drums were discovered by U.S. special forces near the industrial town of Baiji, about 115 miles north of Baghdad. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Final Tests Find No Nerve Agents in Iraqi Chemical
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.