Ohio Avoids Massive Cuts; Other States Still in Doubt. (News Fronts)

By Eberhart, George M. | American Libraries, May 2003 | Go to article overview

Ohio Avoids Massive Cuts; Other States Still in Doubt. (News Fronts)


Eberhart, George M., American Libraries


An April 2 rally outside the Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio, by some 350 library staff and supporters who chanted 'Ohio loves libraries" beneath the office windows of state legislators apparently had the desired effect. House leaders had announced earlier in the week a plan to trim $450 million or more from the Library and Local Government Support Fund (LLGSF), or even eliminate it entirely, as part of a solution to the state's projected $4-billion deficit over the next two years.

Meribah Mansfield, director of Worthington Libraries and chair of the Ohio Library Council board of trustees, told the crowd, "Our goal here today is simple: To show the legislature and the public that Ohio loves its libraries, and that the libraries in the State of Ohio need adequate funding to maintain the level of service that Ohioans have come to expect."

The House recommendation, announced April 4, left the library part of the LLGSF at 5.7% of the state income tax, relieving fears that an estimated two-thirds of the state's 250 public libraries would shut down if the LLGSF were eliminated, OLC, which organized the rally, credits its members for influencing lawmakers and involving the public in securing adequate library funding.

OLC Executive Director Douglas S. Evans told American Libraries, "We're encouraging Ohio librarians to thank their representatives for their support and to focus their energies on influencing the Ohio Senate to adopt a similar bill."

The legislature is considering alternatives to Gov. Bob Taft's proposed $3.1-billion tax hike, which would raise state business, cigarette, and alcohol taxes. Taft is opposed to trimming the LLGSF, since revenue shortfalls have already resulted in a decision to eliminate state funding to libraries for one month, in July (AL, Apr., p. 17).

The House released its final two-year budget plan April 8, freezing LLGSF aid at the 2003 rates, some $53.6 million less than Gov. Taft had originally requested, according to the April 9 Cleveland Plain Dealer. The House also called for a temporary one-cent increase in the state sales tax to help balance the budget.

Evans remarked that it was fortunate that lawmakers did not "take the opportunity to pass a bill that could potentially close libraries during National Library Week."

Rocky road for Colorado

Ohio's narrow escape is only one of a long list of other state financial crunches affecting libraries. Librarians in Colorado, for example, were still trying in mid-April to convince the legislature not to zero out funding for the state's seven regional library systems.

As part of its preliminary 2003- 2004 budget, the Colorado Senate voted April 8 to eliminate the $2.4 million that supports the regional library systems, which were created in 1976 to provide shared cataloging through the Colorado Virtual Library Web site, interlibrary loan, courier services, continuing education, and technical advice to academic, public, school, and special libraries in the state. A bill was introduced in the House April 10 to restore $1 million of the systems funding; if passed, it will go to the Senate for consideration. If the House and Gov. Bill Owens wind up going along with the Senate's move to eliminate the systems, they will have to close or seek alternative funding as of October 1. Some 22 full-time-equivalent employees would be affected.

Donna Morris, director of the Arkansas Valley Regional Library Service System in Pueblo, told American Libraries that a proposal to reinsert nearly $900,000 in funding for the libraries was voted down 14-21 in the Senate the same day. "We do have some library supporters in the House," she added. "At this point we are looking for someone to put some type of funding back into the budget. Once we have a solid proposal for people to support, we can get our message across to legislators."

Funding for the Department of Education's Talking Book Library in Denver, state universities, and prison libraries would also be hit hard. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ohio Avoids Massive Cuts; Other States Still in Doubt. (News Fronts)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.