You'll Be Eating Apple Pie Soon; What Jordan Vowed after Coming Second to Tony Blair in a Poll of the 100 Worst Britons. We Think She Meant Humble Pie

By Newbon, Claire | The Mail on Sunday (London, England), May 11, 2003 | Go to article overview

You'll Be Eating Apple Pie Soon; What Jordan Vowed after Coming Second to Tony Blair in a Poll of the 100 Worst Britons. We Think She Meant Humble Pie


Newbon, Claire, The Mail on Sunday (London, England)


Byline: CLAIRE NEWBON

TONY BLAIR has been voted the nation's most unpopular person after topping a poll to find the worst living Briton.

Despite reinventing the Labour Party and leading it to two landslide election victories, he proved to be even more unpopular than Baroness Thatcher, who was third in the survey on a TV show.

In between them, as the second most annoying person in the country, was glamour model Jordan, who obviously felt those who had voted for her would receive their just deserts.

After being told the news, she said: 'What goes around, comes around - I'm a great believer in that. So eat your apple pie.' Producers of the show pointed out that she actually meant to say 'humble pie'.

She was also magnanimous in defeat, adding: 'I would like to congratulate Tony Blair on his win.

Next year, I will just have to try that little bit harder.' Her agent explained: 'With Tony Blair at number one, she's obviously in good company but she did want to beat the Prime Minister.

Jordan likes to win and she'd rather be first than be at number 100.' The damning result for Mr Blair came after more than 100,000 people voted on a shortlist prepared for Channel 4's 100 Worst Britons show screened last night.

And there was more bad news for Mr Blair - his wife Cherie, who has been criticised for her love of freebies after a well publicised shopping spree in Australia, came 89th. But the Blair result could reflect views of the British antiwar lobby, as votes were cast in February and March when the nation was gearing up for the Iraq conflict.

Mr Blair fought off fierce competition from a shortlist including the Royal Family, reality TV contestants, pop singers, TV presenters and sports personalities.

The world of politics accounts for 12 positions in the poll, including Mr Blair's spokesman Alastair Campbell. Iain Duncan Smith was the only current Tory MP to feature, scraping on to the list at 99.

The Queen came well ahead of other Royals at number ten. Prince Charles was voted in at 24. The Earl and Countess of Wessex, who are expecting their first child, were voted 40th and 63rd respectively.

Despite being two of the nation's best known fashion icons, Liz Hurley and Victoria Beckham both managed to make the top 100.

Victoria, who is currently trying to launch a film and music career in America, came 13th, 78 places ahead of her footballer husband David. But after receiving a string of public reprimands from Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson, David may find some consolation in hearing his boss came seventh.

And Victoria, who is said to be jealous of Geri Halliwell's success as a solo artist, will no doubt be pleased to hear that her ex-Spice Girl colleague has made it into another top ten chart, at nine.

Figures from the music world accounted for more than 20 places on the list, with singer Gareth Gates proving to be the least popular chart star at number six.

The British love affair with reality TV shows also appears to be on the wane. Big Brother contestant Jade Goody was voted the fourth most annoying person in Britain and Pop Idol panellists Simon Cowell and Pete Waterman and presenters Ant and Dec were also listed. …

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