Interrogation: Rupert the Bare; Just Because Rupert Everett Once Sent His Pubic Hair Clippings to Theatre-Goers Who Offended Him, Didn't Mean We Were Going to Play It Safe with Our Questions

Sunday Mirror (London, England), May 18, 2003 | Go to article overview

Interrogation: Rupert the Bare; Just Because Rupert Everett Once Sent His Pubic Hair Clippings to Theatre-Goers Who Offended Him, Didn't Mean We Were Going to Play It Safe with Our Questions


Byline: Sarah Ivens

Where are you now? Rupert Everett: I'm in Montreal with Sharon Stone and it's rather cold. We're working on a film called A Different Loyalty and we're also shooting in Malta and Moscow. I love the travelling part of my job.

How different is your life to how you expected it to be as a child?

RE: I couldn't have imagined it would turn out like this. I used to burst into floods of tears at the thought of going in a car. I got travel sickness and would sit in the back of my parents' car, thinking, `This is way too fast.' Then I had periods of sobbing in bed, worrying about the day I'd have to drive that fast. And now here I am. My life is hectic and I travel all around the world.

Do you go home to Norfolk often?

RE: I go back all the time. I was born there in 1959, when country life had a lovely innocence. I'm now based in New York and I miss England so much. But it's good to avoid the weather and just get highlights from my friends, rather than getting dragged down in everyone's problems.

What do you like about America?

RE: When I was a kid, everyone wanted to go there. I'm sad it's changed now. The American dream of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness seemed so totally on the mark. But for work, of course, it's still the best place to be.

What do you think of your pal Madonna's new album, American Life?

RE: I love it. It's beautiful and she looks amazing on the cover. There was a lot of controversy about the war-themed video, but I'm sure it was good for publicity.

You've sung with Madonna and Robbie Williams - who's next?

RE: I had a drunken evening with the fantastic Shirley Bassey the other day, and she promised to let me sing on her next album. But I haven't heard another word from her. I don't know what we'd sing, but I'm into hip hop and house.

How do you relax?

RE: I haven't relaxed since puberty. My ideal weekend would be spent sitting in my bedroom. I wouldn't do anything extraordinary, just email my friends and watch a bit of telly. Because I live in New York, I'm not tempted to rush around everywhere like people who only have a few days in the city.

You're 43 - did life begin at 40 for you?

RE: I've enjoyed life more since I hit 35. I started to feel settled then, whereas in my 20s I was confused about everything. As you get older, you get more certain - but you also get set in your ways, which isn't so good.

What's your biggest fashion faux pas?

RE: Everyone looked funny in the 80s - MTV reminds us of that - so I don't regret the make-up and glitter. I just keep going, making more mistakes along the way.

Do you use your fluent French and Italian when you're on the pull?

RE: I haven't tried it, but I will if you think it will work.

Is it true you sent clippings of your pubic hair to theatre-goers who complained about your performance in The Vortex?

RE: I did. They said they couldn't hear what I was saying. It was probably true, but it upset me, so I wrote back, saying, `Please accept my apologies and these pubic hairs' - and sellotaped them to the back of the note paper. It was a joke, but they didn't take it that way and sent it to a newspaper.

What makes you angry?

RE: Everything. On an angry day, I'm just angry, especially when I'm worried or scared. My anger is like a rumbling under the surface, a kind of `grrrrr'. But I'm not like that all the time. I do control it.

In your new film, To Kill A King, you play Charles I, who was beheaded by Cromwell. …

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