Salute to Fathers. (Ebony Bookshelf)

Ebony, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Salute to Fathers. (Ebony Bookshelf)


GIVE your father or father figure a standing ovation this month. June is the month to honor the men who stayed, prayed and made a way for themselves and their families. Although much ado is made about mothers--and rightly so--not enough is said about the men who made a difference in the lives of their daughters and sons. All research says that Black children with strong fathers and father figures begin with a head start in life. Bishop T.D. Jakes has said that if his late father, who owned a janitorial service, hadn't swung his mop, he wouldn't be here today to swing his Bible.

So whether they are living or a precious memory, these remarkable men deserve all honor and praise on their day. To salute them we feature several books this month by authors who address the complex nature of Brothers.

SOUND THE TRUMPET! MESSAGES TO EMPOWER AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN (Judson Press, $14.00) edited by Darryl D. Sims features inspirational and instructional messages of encouragement for Black men from several prominent Black theologians. The book includes messages from the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright, Dr. Charles E. Booth, Dr. Walter S. Thomas and father and son pastors, Dr. Otis Moss Jr. and the Rev. Otis Moss III. The book openly explores many of the issues faced by Black men in society, such as fighting the wrong enemies, raising another man's child and living single.

BLACK FATHERS: A CALL FOR HEALING (Doubleday, $22.95) by Kristin Clark Taylor celebrates the role fathers play in their children's lives and encourages all African-American men to become a stronger presence in their families. Anecdotes from fathers that exemplify positive parenting are woven throughout the book, including some from her father and husband. She also offers suggestions on how fathers can strengthen their relations with their children. Clark is a journalist and the first African-American woman to hold the post of White House Director of Media Relations.

When Marvin Gaye was shot to death by his father nearly 20 years ago, all of his fans asked, "What's Goin' On?" MARVIN GAYE, MY BROTHER (Backbeat Books, $24.95) by Frankie Gaye with Fred E. Basten provides those answers and tries to set the record straight about his brilliant brother's untimely death. Frankie Gaye, who died in 2001, reveals in intimate detail many personal anecdotes and behind-the--scenes accounts of the troubled singer's life from their childhood to the day of Marvin's death when he cradled the dying singer in his arms and heard his last words.

June is also the bride's month and a new book, THE AFROCENTRIC BRIDE: A STYLE GUIDE (Amber Books, $16.95) by Therez Fleetwood shows brides how to select the best bridal gown and silhouette to flatter every figure, how to choose the perfect accessories to complement the gown, how to choose bridesmaids' dresses and how to select the best styles for the groom and the groomsmen.

BROWN SKIN: PRESCRIPTION FOR FLAWLESS SKIN, HAIR AND NAILS (Amistad, $24.95) by Susan C. Taylor, M.D., a Harvard-trained dermatologist, is a comprehensive, culturally specific guide for women of color that explores the characteristics of skin and hair color, offers self-assessments, daily care routines, brand-name recommendations and patient-tested solutions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Salute to Fathers. (Ebony Bookshelf)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.