EPA: Funding and Pollution Problems Persist. (Water Quality)

By Hun, Tara | Environmental Health Perspectives, April 2003 | Go to article overview

EPA: Funding and Pollution Problems Persist. (Water Quality)


Hun, Tara, Environmental Health Perspectives


The provision of wastewater treatment and clean drinking water may experience a funding gap of more than $500 billion between projected needs and current spending levels during the next two decades. Despite this crisis, nonpoint-source pollution (NPSP) remains the nation's largest water quality threat. These are the findings of two reports released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2002, The Clean Water and Drinking Water Infrastructure Gap Analysis and the National Water Quality Inventory: 2000 Report.

The starting points for the gap analysis were ongoing EPA surveys of the nation's 16,000 publicly owned wastewater treatment plants and 75,400 drinking water systems. Comparing projected growth to current spending levels, the gap analysis projects an average capital and operations/maintenance gap of $271 billion for wastewater treatment and $263 billion for drinking water by 2019. And assuming that spending will increase by 3% per year, the gap narrows to $31 billion for wastewater treatment and $45 billion for drinking water.

Paul Pinault, executive director of the Narrangansett Bay Commission and president of the Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies, says the gap was created in large part when the federal government backed away from "its commitment to fund water and wastewater infrastructure." He notes, for example, that the EPA's proposed fiscal year 2004 budget would cut monies for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund Program by nearly $500 million over previous budgets. This fund was mandated by the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1987 to provide low-interest loans for infrastructure improvements.

G. Tracy Mehan III, EPA assistant administrator of the Office of Water, says the 2004 budget extends the federal commitment to fund wastewater treatment through 2011 and drinking water through 2018. He further says that utilities need to look at every opportunity to close the gap, including full-cost pricing (charging customers the actual cost of the service), proper asset management, and anticipating problems before they occur. He also recommends implementing water reuse projects, increasing federal funding, and consolidating resources, purchasing power, and systems.

The crisis in water infrastructure funding is dire, but NPSP is an even greater threat to U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

EPA: Funding and Pollution Problems Persist. (Water Quality)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.