Top Hats and No Trousers: Sheridan Morley Enjoys a French Farce but Finds Pinter's Novel Doesn't Work as a Play. (Theatre)

By Morley, Sheridan | New Statesman (1996), May 12, 2003 | Go to article overview

Top Hats and No Trousers: Sheridan Morley Enjoys a French Farce but Finds Pinter's Novel Doesn't Work as a Play. (Theatre)


Morley, Sheridan, New Statesman (1996)


"Farce," the late Ben Travers once told me, "is all about doors. They have to open and close at embarrassing moments, and the wrong people have to keep coming through them." Nobody, at least in this country, has ever known more about farce than "Big Ben". It is therefore courageous of Sam Walters to produce and direct Georges Feydeau's The Game Hunter on the Orange Tree's open stage, without so much as a convenient door -- or even cupboard -- in sight.

If you sit stage left at this production, you have the added delight of watching Samantha Tagg, the deputy stage manager, making all the right noises of doors opening and closing, and even playing a piano, which on stage is merely mimed. She is surely set for a glorious future as a BBC Radio sound-effects specialist.

When this translation by Richard Cottrell was first staged in 1964, it seemed to me less confident, less hilarious than the two other Feydeau farces that John Mortimer had recently adapted for Laurence Olivier's new National Theatre at the Old Vic. At the time, I was inclined to ascribe this to Mortimer himself being a playwright. But now I am not so sure. Cottrell takes fewer liberties with the original, allowing the marital-infidelity plot to take its time in coming to a climax, in which men wearing top hats but no trousers are obliged to reconsider the survival of both their marriages and their liaisons more-than-dangereuses.

As Groucho Marx once noted, whereas it is enough for comedy to have an actor dressed as an old lady tumble down a steep staircase, for farce you need a real old lady. This is perhaps the only genre of theatre at which the French surpass us, as all those with memories of the Whitehall Theatre in the 1950s and 1960s can testify. To find a series of equally good British farces, you have to go all the way back to the productions that the aforementioned Ben Travers staged at the Aldwych in the late 1920s.

Travers realised that classic farce has to have an element of cruelty. The only moment of cruelty in this production occurs when a smug and self-satisfied poet (Stuart Fox) discovers that his cherished first volume has been used to support a shaky desk leg. Pride has seldom come more injured.

In the same conversation, Travers also referred to the new National Theatre's catastrophic opening production of Carlo Goldoni's Il Campieilo. …

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Top Hats and No Trousers: Sheridan Morley Enjoys a French Farce but Finds Pinter's Novel Doesn't Work as a Play. (Theatre)
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