Dreamer Whose Legacy Has Delighted Thousands; He Is an Almost Forgotten Figure but Joseph Mayer Is One of the Great Men Behind Merseyside's Cultural Development. David Charters Reports

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), May 21, 2003 | Go to article overview

Dreamer Whose Legacy Has Delighted Thousands; He Is an Almost Forgotten Figure but Joseph Mayer Is One of the Great Men Behind Merseyside's Cultural Development. David Charters Reports


Byline: David Charters

THE little boy was a bit of a dreamer with an appreciative eye for paintings and sculpture, rather than the evil smells which arose from the family tannery which supplied straps and harnesses to potteries.

But one day, shortly after his eighth birthday, when following the furrows of a plough, his world was changed.

There, in the mud, Joseph Mayer saw some Roman coins and pottery.

That discovery began an interest, which would turn Mayer into one of Britain's foremost collector of antiquities and a great benefactor of what has become the National Museums and Gal-leries on Merseyside (NMGM) - a man whose collection of classical relics, Egyptian art, prehistoric metal objects and pottery, medieval artefacts and later pottery, has been compared to the treasure troves of Glasgow's Sir WilliamBurrell and the first Viscount Leverhulme of Port Sunlight.

Some would give an even higher place to Mayer, the silversmith and jeweller, who donated his vast collection to Liverpool Corporation in 1867.

If Liverpool is successful in its bid to be the 2008 European Capital of Culture, the name of Mayer, which hasIONEL Burman, research fellow of history at Liverpool University and former curator of decorative arts with NMGM, rates Mayer among Britain's most important collectors of antiquities, whose influence spread to both sides of the Mersey.

In 1860, Mayer moved to Bebington, calling his substantial home Pennant House, after Thomas Pennant (1726-98), the em in en t Welsh traveller, naturalist and and zoologist.

``He made an enormous difference to Bebington, Bromborough and the area around it,'' said Mr Burman. ``He built and developed the Mayer Library, stocked with 20,000 of his own volumes, and paid for the staffing of it, involving the whole society. He even made fireworks for celebrations. ``He then purchased property and five acres of land around Pennant House. Within weeks it was open to the public,as the park now called Mayer Park. Between the library and the park,he demolished a barn and built Mayer Hall, where important exhibitions and a series of lectures were held. ``When he endowed the lectures he stipulated that there should be no mention of religion or politics. He created in that part of the Wirral a cultural scene which continued. '' But it was in Liverpool that Mayer's main reputation was established. At the age of 19, he left his native Newcastle-underLyme and came to the bustling port, where he worked with his brother-in-law, gaining a name for himself as a dealer in precious stones, Sheffield plate and time-pieces, and as a heraldic engraver and designer, based in Lord Street.

During this time, young Mayer frequented the gentleman's clubs like the Lyceum and the Athenaeum. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dreamer Whose Legacy Has Delighted Thousands; He Is an Almost Forgotten Figure but Joseph Mayer Is One of the Great Men Behind Merseyside's Cultural Development. David Charters Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.