The Sound of Silence; Cruising through the Fjords Past Country She Skied as a Child, Provided TV Vet Trude Mostue with a Chance to Relax and with More Stories to Tell English Friends Who Know Little More about Norway Than Its Hopeless Record in the Eurovision Song Contest

The Birmingham Post (England), May 24, 2003 | Go to article overview

The Sound of Silence; Cruising through the Fjords Past Country She Skied as a Child, Provided TV Vet Trude Mostue with a Chance to Relax and with More Stories to Tell English Friends Who Know Little More about Norway Than Its Hopeless Record in the Eurovision Song Contest


Byline: Trude Mostue

I have lived in England for almost 12 years, and I must confess that on and off I have been pining for the Norwegian fjords. I feel ashamed to admit to this, but although I was a born and bred in Norway, I have never done the coastal voyage.

Also, having lived in England for so long, I have noticed how little the average British person knows about Norway and I have become increasingly keen to prove that there is actually more to Norway than nil points in the Eurovision song contest, oil, fish and funny coloured jumpers.

Howard, my fiance, and I flew to Oslo and then on to Bergen - which was rainy and grey when we arrived, unfortunately very normal in this part of Norway. The ship was impressive, but also smaller than I expected - it has 85 staff members and can carry up to 1,000 passengers.

Although the Finnmarken is one of the new Millennium ships, this type of cruising is certainly not new in Norway. The Norwegians call the boat the Hurtigruten which means 'fast route' and it dates back more than 100 years. It used to be one of the main means of transport of goods, post and passengers along the coastline of Norway before flights and trains became available. Although the ship still functions as a transport vehicle for the locals, its main industry comes from tourists.

Travelling from Bergen in the south to Kirkenes in the North, the ship is sheltered by the many islands along the coastline which means that the sea is normally calm and settled.

On most of the decks the windows are panoramic so you can watch the scenery float past. We also discovered a gym, a beauty parlour and even found a jacuzzi on the top deck for those who fancy a dip while watching the mountains.

I was very surprised at the silence. No roaring engines could be heard anywhere which is amazing considering the size of the ship. We often woke to discover we had docked but hadn't heard anything at all.

The Finnmarken calls at a range of ports along the coast - and at many of them you can get off and have a look around.

We travelled through the Geiranger fjord - probably one of the most famous fjords in Norway. We spent much or our day reading books and watching the fjords and mountains go past. It's hard to explain, maybe this is because I grew up skiing in them from three years old, but I find mountains with snow capped tops and fjords the most beautiful sight in the world.

Most people spend time on board taking in the wonderful views and, thanks to the brilliant design of the ship, it doesn't really matter where you sit as they are all around.

There didn't seem to be a system for checking everyone was back on board before the ship departed again. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Sound of Silence; Cruising through the Fjords Past Country She Skied as a Child, Provided TV Vet Trude Mostue with a Chance to Relax and with More Stories to Tell English Friends Who Know Little More about Norway Than Its Hopeless Record in the Eurovision Song Contest
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.