Resisting the Politics of Domination. (Editorial)

Canadian Dimension, May-June 2003 | Go to article overview

Resisting the Politics of Domination. (Editorial)


While admiring aspects of its popular culture, many Canadians have an instinctive distrust of the U.S's political culture and its accompanying ethos -- the constant American resort to the use of violence, the hyper-greed of its corporate commercialism, the national narcissism and the desire to dominate. Granted, the politics and culture of domination are not uniquely American. But in light of the human destruction of the second Gulf War, the voices from the State Department and the White House proclaming the U.S.'s right to global dominance now strike on the ear in a peculiarly offensive way. Perhaps this is because we have just been reminded of how much these voices of irrationality are hacked up by the force of technological arms, unrestrained by popular opinion, democratic consensus, or international law.

The occupation of Iraq is the latest episode in the 24-hour-a-day CNN newscast of the American politics of domination. And we can rest assured that, no matter which puppet government the U.S. installs in Baghdad, the U.S. superpower will never voluntarily leave. In this respect, the occupation of Iraq is merely the latest addition to a long US. list of strategic and financial outposts now encircling the globe: Guam, Hawaii, the Philippines, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan.

Just as Noam Chomsky and others warned, Iraq has become the trial run of the Bush Doctrine of preventative war -- what the U.S. calls a "new norm" in international relations. According to this doctrine, the United States alone has the right to attack any country it claims to be a threat. The Bush Doctrine announced last September declared that the U.S. will rule the world by force and that it will do so for the indefinite future. If any potential challenge arises to U.S. domination, the U.S. will destroy it.

A fierce campaign, led by Stephen Harper and his "American" Alliance - together with the monolithically pro-war media led by the "American" Post, the gushing Friends of America and their full-page ads and rallies, Imperial America's other chums Don Cherry, Allan Gotlieb and Tom Aquino, and all the other suspects -- tried desperately to win over Canadians to this grand design. But few in Canada have been fooled into believing that the overthrow of the Saddam regime was about terrorism, tyranny, or even weapons of mass destruction.

Enlightened opinion here is clear that the occupation of Iraq is part of the U.S's geo-strategic plan to dominate the world, with the seizure of Iraqi oil fields as the immediate payback for costs incurred. It is almost child's play to see that U.S. control of oil reserves in the Middle East, South America and the Caspian Sea renders dependent all potential challengers for world or regional supremacy -- whether that challenge emanates from Japan, Europe, or China. The dependency is reflected in the statistics: Japan imports 98 per cent of its oil; Germany, 96 per cent; France, 95 per cent; with China similarly vulnerable, given its rapid but fossil-fuel-reliant economic expansion.

Since Prime Minister Jean Chretien has a fair reading of the enlightened Canadian mind, he knew he was safe in his decision not to back down from his refusal to have Canada formally join the U. …

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