Women Drink Healthy Beverages More Often Than Men Do. (Spotlight on Healthy Foods)

Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Women Drink Healthy Beverages More Often Than Men Do. (Spotlight on Healthy Foods)


Women are more likely than men to drink healthy beverages on a daily basis, according to a recent survey by The Hartman Group. Four in 10 women (42%) drink five or more healthy beverages daily; only 27% of men drink that many each day.

Beverages women and men consider healthy include water (tap or bottled), juice, hot tea, milk or flavored milk, juice drinks (<100% juice), soymilk, protein drinks, sports drinks, and others. Men (37%) are more likely than women (25%) to say they drink coffee as a healthy beverage, while women are more likely to drink water (89% of women and 81% of men). Men are also more likely than women to drink juice (82% of men, 70% of women) or juice drinks (43% of men, 34% of women) as healthy beverages (see charts on next page).

Women and men are about equally likely to consider drinking a healthy beverage a means of addressing a specific health concern. Women are more likely than men to consider addressing bone strength, cold or flu, and weight control via beverages, while men are more likely than women to consider using beverages to treat vitamin deficiencies and improve endurance (see table at right).

Women express greater interest in flavored waters than men do, while men are more interested in fortified juices (see table at right).

When asked about the ingredients that should not be included in a healthy beverage, more than three quarters of women and men agree that artificial coloring and flavoring, saccharin, and artificial sweetener don't belong. Three quarters of women (76%) and 69% of men think caffeine has no place in healthy beverages, while just over half (53% of women and 54% of men) would banish sugar.

The study also examines consumers' consumption of and attitudes toward healthy beverages according to their lifestyle profiles, which describe attitudes about wellness. Segments include Healthy Living, Healthy Family, Sports and Fitness, Environmental, Vegetarian/vegan, and Organic. [FOOD/BEVERAGES, HUMAN BEHAVIOR, HEALTHCARE/ MEDICAL, OPINION]

Daily Consumption of Healthy Beverages, By Gender

              Women  Men

9-10 per day     8%   2%
7-8 per day     12%   8%
5-6 per day     19%  14%
3-4 per day     20%  25%
1-2 per day     29%  35%
< 1 per day      9%  13%

Source: The Hartman Group

Note: Table made from bar graph

Beverages Drun As "Healthy" By Women And Men

                                         Women  Men

Water                                      89%  81%
Juice                                      70%  82%
Hot tea                                    54%  51%
Milk/flavored milk                         46%  48%
Juice drink (<100% juice)                  34%  43%
Coffee                                     25%  37%
Soymilk/soy-based beverage                 22%  20%
Protein drink                              19%  29%
Bottled tea                                17%  26%
Sports drink (e. … 

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