Book Reviews

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), June 11, 2003 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews


Geri halliwell: just for the record

with the paperback version of her second autobiography, Geri Halliwell includes an extra chapter detailing her latest antics, including the reunion with her fellow Spice Girls and projects such as Popstars: The Rivals and All-American Girl.

For the most part, this autobiography expresses the excesses of Miss Halliwell's lifestyle. From wanting complete dominance in the UK charts to battles with her food-based addictions, grief at her father's death, and dealing with the pressures of fame, we are continuously reminded of Geri's constant dismay with one or other aspect of her life.

On one hand, it aims to tell the truth surrounding the headlines about her relationships and ever-changing body shape, but there lies an element of suspicion that this may be yet another ploy to prolong her fame.

I was surprised to find that I was not that captivated by this book. The information did not seem to flow comfortably and little was anecdotally amusing.

The additional chapter, did change the mood of the book by taking on a lighter tone and a more conversational dimension, but throughout is American psycho-talk - "passive commitment phobe" and "compulsive overeater bulimic-anorexic" - which lowered the feel of the book being written on a personal level.

RACHEL NIGHTINGALE

TIFFANIE DeBARTOLO: SHAPE OF MY HEART.

I was excited at the prospect of reading DeBartolo's debut, especially when I discovered she penned the script for the film Dream for an Insomniac, which I enjoyed. Imagine my disappointment, then, at finding this novel reads like a really bad episode of Dawson's Creek. The author's over-philosophising means the pages simply drip with self-pity and pretension. …

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