Introduction to the Federalist Society 2002 Symposium on Law and Truth; Banquet Panel on the Founding of the Federalist Society

By McIntosh, David | Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, Winter 2003 | Go to article overview

Introduction to the Federalist Society 2002 Symposium on Law and Truth; Banquet Panel on the Founding of the Federalist Society


McIntosh, David, Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy


In looking back at the founding of the Federalist Society as a conservative law student organization it is clear that Steve Calabresi, Lee Liberman Otis, and Gary Lawson were the intellectual powerhouses who put together the original symposiums. Spence Abraham and my jobs were to take care of logistics and organization. There are a few funny episodes that happened along the way.

For the most part we all talked through and agreed on everything. However, as we began to institutionalize the Federalist Society the question of what to name the new organization turned out to be an issue we could not easily resolve. The Yale Chapter--much like the small states at the constitutional convention in Philadelphia--insisted that the name be the same one they called themselves: "The Federalist Society" Harvard, perhaps following in the tradition of the Massachusetts Founders, had a different idea. In the late 1970's many of them had already joined forces in the founding of the first conservative law journal--the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy. Spence Abraham, who was the founding publisher of the Harvard Journal and also a board member of the new national student organization, felt strongly that the name should be "The Society for Law and Public Policy." Finally after months of debate--mercifully by telephone rather than sequestered in Philadelphia--we reached a grand Federalist compromise. The full legal name of the organization would be "The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy." The first half of the name was the Yale and Chicago student chapters name. The second half of the name came from the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy. We've been successful ever since.

Another question that came up at our founding was the adoption of an emblem. In this case everyone quickly resolved that a bust of James Madison should be prominently displayed in our material. After all he was the drafter of the United States Constitution and the great Federalist compromise that established our form of government. He was our hero. So, we commissioned a silhouette portrait of President James Madison. It is the one that you now see on all the Federalist Society brochures. We turned to Judge Bork's son, Charles Bork, who is also a fellow Yalie and quite enterprising. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Introduction to the Federalist Society 2002 Symposium on Law and Truth; Banquet Panel on the Founding of the Federalist Society
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.