Infanticide Apologists in Congress

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 15, 2003 | Go to article overview

Infanticide Apologists in Congress


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The 33 senators and 139 members of Congress who voted to affirm the atrocity of partial-birth abortion are morally unfit for public service. This is strong language, to be sure. But this issue demands nothing less than plain talk.

These elected servants see no moral repugnance in a procedure that entails an abortionist partially delivering a live baby, then puncturing the infant's skull and vacuuming out the brain. The procedure is unrecognized in any medical textbook, by any college of medicine or professional medical association. It has been likened to infanticide, but that characterization is inaccurate: It is infanticide.

The partial-birth abortion procedure should not be tolerated in any society that purports to be civilized. Had such horrors been committed by a demented Dr. Josef Mengele in a Nazi concentration camp, the world properly would have recoiled in revulsion and arisen in moral outrage. Yet 33 U.S. senators and 139 members of the United States Congress voted to affirm this revolting practice. Anyone so insensitive to such an affront to the inherent worth and dignity of every human life has rendered himself or herself unfit to hold an office of public trust. No one holding racist or anti-Semitic opinions would be judged fit for elective office. Likewise, anyone who defends infanticide is morally unfit.

In the most recent Gallup Poll taken in January, more than 70 percent of Americans opposed partial-birth abortion and supported making it illegal. Yet a third of the members of the Senate and House voted to affirm the killing of fully developed babies through the most horrific means imaginable. This was a breathtaking demonstration of moral blindness.

The extremist supporters of partial-birth abortion dismissed the American public's moral outrage and asserted that "only" 2,200 such procedures are performed annually. While there is reason to believe the actual number is much larger, let's accept it as accurate. Imagine the public's reaction were seven little children abducted and brutally murdered every day day after day. Congress recently established a nationwide Amber Alert system to address relatively rare cases of child abduction. But one-third of Congress could not summon the moral sensibility to banish the horror of partial-birth abortion and its deadly toll.

Predictably, House passage of the PBA bill sent the pro-abortion crowd into near hysterics. …

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