Wrecked Lives: Beryl Bainbridge Reflects on the Small Reminders of a Gigantic Tragedy. (Exhibition)

By Bainbridge, Beryl | New Statesman (1996), June 9, 2003 | Go to article overview

Wrecked Lives: Beryl Bainbridge Reflects on the Small Reminders of a Gigantic Tragedy. (Exhibition)


Bainbridge, Beryl, New Statesman (1996)


Shortly before midnight on 14 April 1912, the "unsinkable" SS Titanic struck an iceberg on her maiden voyage to New York. She sank less than three hours later.

The causes of such a disaster were numerous. A blaze, started by the friction of coal descending at speed into the boilers, had accelerated before the ship left Belfast -- in spite of this, a certificate of seaworthiness was issued before her departure from Southampton; the fire continued for two days into the voyage, no doubt weakening the metal structure of the vessel; there was an insufficient number of lifeboats, and the crew had not been drilled in the correct release and management of those available; although other ships in the Atlantic had slowed on account of reports of icebergs, Captain Edward J Smith ordered full speed ahead.

Intimations of the tragedy to follow began in the first-class salon. The ice cubes in a poker player's glass tinkled as though shaken by an unseen hand. That was the moment when pieces of the visible iceberg, shaved off when sliding alongside the Titanic, bounced upon her lower decks. The gigantic, invisible and destructive mass drifting beneath the waterline sliced a huge gash in the liner's side and consigned her to the deep.

The water rose approximately l4ft above the keel. The watertight bulkhead between boiler rooms Nos 6 and 5 extended only as high as E deck. The first five compartments filled and the weight of the water pulled the Titanic down at the bow. As she sank lower, the water from No 6 boiler room swamped No 5 boiler room and flooded Nos 4,3,2--and soon. Captain Smith, with the help of Bruce Ismay, managing director of the ship's owners, calculated the extent and outcome of the damage at two minutes to midnight. The Titanic had an hour and a half, possibly two, before she sank.

Another vessel was believed to be not far away, and rockets were fired to engage its attention. These signals of distress were mistaken for a display of fireworks; after all, the Titanic was unsinkable. Seven hundred and fifty survivors rowed off in the partially empty lifeboats and watched as the mighty ship, her bulk outlined in stars, plunged into the depths with a cargo of 1,500 men, women and children.

On 14 July 1986, lights from a submersible at the bottom of the Atlantic pierced through the blackness to illuminate the corroded bow of the SS Titanic. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wrecked Lives: Beryl Bainbridge Reflects on the Small Reminders of a Gigantic Tragedy. (Exhibition)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.